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I haven't had mine on the saw since right after I got the saw. I do know where it is.


Not a good excuse, I just make so many changes that it is in the way. I use a panel sled on the saw a lot and can't used the guard with it.


I would love to have one of the suspended ones.

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I've been using my dad's Jet and I'm not sure where the guard is for that thing. When I was at school I always had the guys using the guard. About the only time we didn't use it was sometimes when doing dados or when ripping down big sheets of plywood or MDF. Actually in the 50 years before the shop was closed at school I don't think anyone had anything major happen on the tablesaw. My dad ran his thumb up on it once when he was teaching there, doing a demo and talking instead of watching close enough and ended up with some stitches.

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Alright guys, I guess I am in the minority here. I always use my guard when possible. And with the type of guard I have, it is always possible unless I am cutting something tall. I have a Bies overarm, and the overarms IMHO are the best on the market hands down. I would encourage all you guys to research them and buy one.

Biesemeyer 78-960 T-Square Table Saw BladeGuard System for 50-Inch and 52-Inch Fencesir?t=theamericanwoodworker-20&l=as2&o=1&

The Bies is a bit pricey, I bought mine used for a couple hundred bucks, you can find other brands out there for a fraction of the price. But I am a big fan of anything Bies.

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Hello Ron,

My table saw guard is put away for I don't use it as my work that I do can not be done with a saw guard on and the hassle of taking it off and putting it back on is not worth the time and effort. However, I and my workers all have a healthy respect for the blade and always think "what if!" before we proceed with any cut that might cause any form of kickback.

It's pretty hard to dodge a board or part of a board at 75 MPH, so prior to starting the motor we look for the what if's and work around them. To date, (knock on wood) we have not had any major incidents. Oh sure a little sawdust in the face once in a while but that is what goggles and or face shields are for. I won't run my lathe without my full face shield on.

Also I have a written rule that when we are not at the saw table the blade is lowered below the table top.

Ralph

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I have almost ZERO use for any of the safety gizmos. I think they are all gamey nonsense.

 

40 sumpin years ago I took my  riving knife and hung it on a nail only to be used when I know I'm ripping a lot ( not a little) of lumber that had tension in it.   Otherwise, when ripping a  few pieces of wood I'll just drop little wedges that I pick up off the floor  into the kerf,  just as sawyers of old used to do.

 

I don't use a over head guard at all.  I never have.  I prefer to see the cut closely quite often and guards are always in my way. I can't stand therm.

 

About riving knives and kickback:

You won't get a kick back if - - IF - - you maintain downward pressure on the work.

That's it. There is nothing more to it.

To kick the wood has to come up a tiny little bit  off the table  and engage the blade back there at the lee side of the cut in order to be accelerated back toward the operator. If the work does not rise when the stress collapses it on the blade or binding between a fence and blade or whatever is working to cause it to rise   - - - if it can't rise - - -  then it can't kick.

 

All kickbacks are precipitated by the work lifting off the table on the lee side of the cut, even by  an ever so slight lift of a lousy 20 or 30 thousandths of an inch.  Once the work is up in the air a littler bit the blade  can grab it and hurl it.

 

So I just keep downward pressure on the work.

 

I have had wood collapse on the blade plenty of times while ripping and even gotten burning from the squeezing, but I just push down and through the cut even harder the instant I  feel the squeeze.

 

I do use eye and ear protection

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Never used the guard until fairly recently until installed a mini-split in the shop and realized that I needed to put dust collection on top of the table as well as underneath. I tried modifying the OEM guard by adding a nozzle, with limited success - I think I have it too far forward (towards me) and it would hang up on the material being cut. I spent the money for a Shark Guard and now try to use it whenever possible - can't use it for dadoes or other partial cuts such as grooving the edges of door rails and stiles for the internal panel - but it certainly helps keep the sawdust down.

 

For those that are using a sled, why not consider a dust collector similar to that shown in the photo attached. The guard can be modified with the addition of strips of FastCap Saw Stache   Sealing Strip  to provide better dust control, and the complete guard could be hinged to allow for lining up the blade with the cut line.

 

Edited by tomp
no image in .pdf document

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