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tool613

Wadkin RM Under Over 26" jointer on top a 24x9 planner 1920s to late 40s

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Tool, I am sorry this was missed back in January! How rude of me.

It's looking great man, I am really appreciating the work that went into the removal of the head since I removed mine from my tiny Dewalt 735.

 

That sucker is massive, how much do you think it weighs?

 

And, anything else going on since these photos?

 

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ning-tilttable32wheels-161324-l-39514-43Grin.gifHi Tool,


I am new to this group, but I would like to say that you have the dubious distinction of introducing me, after seeing


you RM youtube(I have a 20 inch version). However the reason for this contact is for advice on a 32inch silver mnf


bandsaw I am attempting to separate from it's current owner. Can you tell me the following.


approximate weight, I can't see an obvious tracking mechanisim, and what is involved in refurbishing babbit bearings ?


I only have pictures of the machine, so am trying arm myself with a litle knowledge before locking horns "commercially"


I am enjoying your posts, keep them coming, I am a wadkin fan (rz jointer, bgf saw,& the rm), the obviously got spread


around the colonies. I would love to lay my hands on a copy of that fm maintenance manual.


PS at this stage they only way I know to send messages is by clicking on reply, so I hope I am not stepping on toes.


 


Regards Sam Calabroning-tilttable32wheels-160309-l-39514-78
 
tool613 said:


John this thing is big. it takes up about the space of 2 10" cabinet saws. a pump cart can move this so that the best mobile base for it. for moving it from location to location you need the serves of rigger(that's the name of the pros that do this type of work). you can do it your self like i did but i have a 7 ton trailer with drop axcels amd hydraulic  dump and drop ramps. Arthur has moved some crazy stuff and is a real pro. he"s the one to tell you what it takes to move  tonnages. In most case you don;t need much.you can move a lot on pipe Maybe Arthur will tell you all about a the 30,000 lbs mill he move this summer.
  jack


English machines
John Morris said:




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sorry boys  i have been busy with work. Is Larry in charge here Grin.gif




Worked on the fence  . I just love the pattern work on the wadkin's. I strong guy will let a little gas out lifting it, but she moves like silk with that rack and pinion.


rm004.jpg


rm007.jpg


rm005.jpg



there are two guards on a modern jointer. There is the stander pork chop and what I will call the back guard that covers the head when the fence is move over the table. Most old jointer don,t have the main and very little have a back guard.The wakin RM never had the back guard and so I made one.

A safety guard has to do 3 things to be of any use.

1 The most important is protect the operator from the cutter head.

2 be easy to adjust and not be in the way of the machines function as it was designed to preform.

3 be easy to remove for assess to the cutter head.

it can than look good if you want .

i have 26" od head to cover and any given time and i wanted to be able to adjust while the machine is running. Most back guards are attached to the fence and so I designed mine to do the same. I simply welded a simple rod and bracket that screwed in taped holes to the fence base for my guard to attach. 

Because the table slide in and out to open the cutter block for moulding my guard needed this adjustment as-well. 

I made it from aluminum and copper to keep it light but strong.




001.jpg






adjustment for sliding in and out


002.jpg




fully extended to 26"


003.jpg


004.jpg






i got a few other things done on it like the motors and the pattern makers table.


i post those latterSmile.gif


what do you think so far boys?




jack


English machines



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Hi Jack


Am enjoying your machinery posts, the castings on all the wadkins are massive and beautiful.


How do you achieve that shine on the raw parts ? and how to keep them shiny, real problem with humidity over


here.


Cheers Sam C
 
tool613 said:


sorry boys  i have been busy with work. Is Larry in charge here Grin.gif




Worked on the fence  . I just love the pattern work on the wadkin's. I strong guy will let a little gas out lifting it, but she moves like silk with that rack and pinion.


rm004.jpg


rm007.jpg


rm005.jpg



there are two guards on a modern jointer. There is the stander pork chop and what I will call the back guard that covers the head when the fence is move over the table. Most old jointer don,t have the main and very little have a back guard.The wakin RM never had the back guard and so I made one.

A safety guard has to do 3 things to be of any use.

1 The most important is protect the operator from the cutter head.

2 be easy to adjust and not be in the way of the machines function as it was designed to preform.

3 be easy to remove for assess to the cutter head.

it can than look good if you want .

i have 26" od head to cover and any given time and i wanted to be able to adjust while the machine is running. Most back guards are attached to the fence and so I designed mine to do the same. I simply welded a simple rod and bracket that screwed in taped holes to the fence base for my guard to attach. 

Because the table slide in and out to open the cutter block for moulding my guard needed this adjustment as-well. 

I made it from aluminum and copper to keep it light but strong.




001.jpg






adjustment for sliding in and out


002.jpg




fully extended to 26"


003.jpg


004.jpg






i got a few other things done on it like the motors and the pattern makers table.


i post those latterSmile.gif


what do you think so far boys?




jack


English machines






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Sam


cleaning rust is part of the job of any restoration. wire wheels and buffing wheel in a grinder. Lots of HP helps. I use T9 for the bare metal and topcaot a spray for cast tops.wax works good if you have the time.




The motor I got for the Wadkin RM is Not a Wadkin Motor. I needed a footed motor to drive the head and This 3 phase 5 HP baby should do a fine job of it. It is most likely off an old band saw based on the bearings . It's got open deep grooved ball bearing set in the bells. One great features to these type motors is the grease bled at the bottom so you can't over grease and the old grease stays out of the motor winding. This motor should last forever for what I am using it for. They say it is wise to change the bearing when you got things apart ,but I have had good luck determining if bearing are good or not by running and looking in side. So far I have only been off once. I must have saved $2000 so far in the rebuild once I started checking the bearing in stead of just changing them because they were old. Most if not all the bearing I am talking about were open . I have never found good old sealed bearing.

the motor after a test run on power.


rmmotor006.jpg




theses bearing looked a sound great and pressure on the shaft had no play. I cleaned the old grease out that was in general good looking . It was not hard or soapafied.




rmmotor007.jpg



rmmotor008.jpg



The fan end bell of the motor had a neat mesh grill to keep shaving out of the motor. It was neat but not up to what I wanted and thought it looked not all that great. It got filed away under G. I made my own at the drill press with some scrap sheet stock.more on that later.


rmmotor018.jpg




So really all and all the rebuilding of this Motor was just maintenance and was ready to go to work. 

For purely atheistic reasons I paint things at this point and like to add what i call an artistic licence. My restoration are what I think they should be and so I indulge myself. I find Machinery in it original state boring and drab and like to hot rod some things.If you like original look away:)









The motor finished






rmmotor019.jpg




rmmotor013.jpg




rmmotor017.jpg




jack


English machines



 

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Hi Jack,


No I'm not in charge here, just trying to lend a helping hand when I can.106.gif 


I've been watching your progress from afar, and as usual it's up to your magnificent over the top standards.77.gif


Keep up the great work.113.gif


 


Larry35.gif


Old Woodworking Machinery Forum Host

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 i did find a Brooks feed motor for $30.


5398cj_20.jpg




 working the bed and what to most people looks bad just needs a shave. For old rusted tables I like to give them a shave.I buy my straight raisers in boxes of 100. took about an hour. 


motor010.jpg




motor011.jpg


i pulled the bed rollers and checked the bearing. they were gone and because they are not to easily serviced I replaced them with rubber sealed SKF. $100.


motor012.jpg


the serrated infeed and smooth outfeed and bed rollers went to a metal lathe to bring them back in spec. I know the guy so $30 but a proshop should only charge an hours labor.


motor015.jpg


the blocks that hold the cutter head and rollers/ pressure bars are all cleaned up and the plain bearings for the rollers were in great shape. Steel in cast "ARN" with oil channels cut in the bearing like in Babbitt. there is a hole left from the hold downs spring rod that leaves a hole for the bearings oil and the ways are cut from there. should I and a piece of felt?


motor014.jpg


bearing were gone on the motor and new sealed SKF $30 bearing were instaled. it look like a rewind had be done. If you have never experienced how smooth a 3 phase motors run watch the video. 


motor016.jpg








jack


English machines

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That looks like a real SWEET machine!!!! and 15 horses at 3 phase means it would probably eat a ryobi and spit it out like a sunflower seed shell!!!!!

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dragon1 said:


That looks like a real SWEET machine!!!! and 15 horses at 3 phase means it would probably eat a ryobi and spit it out like a sunflower seed shell!!!!!



Dragon


Thanks for the coments. 15 hp is not a problem for a machine like this and would be great too. Some of the othere Wadkin planers are running 25HP in this size. Some like the 50" are true monster.That more than 2/ 24" planers. This RM only came with a 5 HP cutter block motor as OEM. I thought about runiing larger but with the head and separate drive motor this is like a 7 hp planer modern machine in terms of power. Its the molding of historical trim that will be great. this machine can run profiles 12" wide and cut 1/1/4" deep in a single pass by placing square head knifes in removable section on the head. Now that's big ass crown.A buddy of mine in Australia just bought a tool room from a saw doctor that was closing up shop and is sending all this old Wadkin Cutter knifes(7/16" thick) and head bolts . New old stock from the 1950s. A real gold mine in the wold of OWWM.





jack


English machines






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Ok looks like I got the drive side all work out as far as mechanical goes. I still need to find a cheep 600 volts VFD for speed control but as it stands I have the stock feed rates of 20/30/46 FPM. I got the 145 frame motor mounted on an old foot mount I had in the rat hole using a peace of 3/8 steel plate. So I have belt adjustment and the shaft height I needed to work with the guards. works just great with the wadkin motor mount. 


001.jpg




Now I just have to get this mount Jackified:) And as you will notice my shoes are just worded in. I love old shoes.


002.jpg




boy handle are the pits.


1 as is,


2 sponged,(what does that mean Larry?)


3 jackified.


handles002.jpg




handles003.jpg




off with the tables


handles004.jpg






jack


English machines

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Hi Jack,


I believe the term is spooged, and have been told that in todays slang lingo it's a bad thing.106.gif


But as far as we are concerned it is the process of cleaning parts using the electrolysis method of cleaning parts.24.gif


 


Larry35.gif


Old Machinery Forum Host

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J.,


He's here he's there he's everywhere, just like Sav Oir Faire!24.gif


Larry35.gif


Old machinery forum Host
J. Vibert said:


Who would have guessed it...


 


A vintage machinery forum, and look who's posting about Wadkin...Grin.gif


 


Is there anywhere I can go and not run into you Jack...?



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I thought I've seen the term also used for a citric acid method of rust removal as well...?

Larry Buskirk said:


I believe the term is spooged, and have been told that in todays slang lingo it's a bad thing.106.gif


But as far as we are concerned it is the process of cleaning parts using the electrolysis method of cleaning parts.24.gif


 


Larry35.gif


Old Machinery Forum Host




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sorry boys i am out there they say111.gif



135lbs motor mount. jesssssssssss.


patterntable014.jpg


patterntable015.jpg




This Wadkin RM came with the special order pattern makers in feed table. What's a Pattern makers table?

When making wood pattern for the foundry sand cast forms, the patterns had to have draft. What's draft?

Draft is a small taper in the pattern forms so that it would release from the sand. So for a joiner to be a Pattern makers the front table has to tip side to side. The table will no longer be coplaner and the wood will be removed more on one side than the other. 

The under side of the table has a large pivot and a thread crank. The edge on the table is milled so that when it is lowered it will go back to co planer when the two machined surfaces meet.


patterntable001.jpg


This thread crank sets in the table 


patterntable002.jpg




The first time I have ever seen this in a Wadkin piece. There is nickel weld in some of the cast to fill in a void in the sand cast. A war machine from 1941 and to wasteful to replace the casting is my guess.


patterntable003.jpg




Next is the rise and fall ways. you can see the planed surfaces that mate the tables.


patterntable004.jpg


Pined to the table


patterntable009.jpg


When theses two surfaces meet the table is co-planer.


patterntable007.jpg


A gauge to read draft. So fine is the machining in this table that even the gauge is flush with the front edge so as not to upset rabbiting.


patterntable008.jpg


Don't let the short table foul you this is a finely tuned machine. All the ways have been scraped in. in machine building terms that is the hand tool marks of a craftsman fitting the parts,


patterntable010.jpg


The other half of the rise and fall and the plate for moving the table in and away from the cutter block for molding.
there are no gib plates to adjust for ware and fit to the side walls, just a hand scraped in fit. By the looks of the ways this 70 year old machine appears not to need them.could just be the size on the ways.


patterntable012.jpg




patterntable013.jpg


The out feed table should be a breeze.


jack
English machines

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Could be J.,


I've also used vinegar and Scotch- Brite pads for removing rust from table surfaces. Hey it works!


Larry35.gif


Old Machinery Forum Host
J. Vibert said:


I thought I've seen the term also used for a citric acid method of rust removal as well...?

Larry Buskirk said:



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Jack,


            It's looking good. Every time I see one of your restorations, I think about tearing my RM or PK apart and reworking it. Then I go into the shop and use them and come back to my senses. You do great work.


 


-Arthur


http://www.owwm.net
 
tool613 said:


sorry boys i am out there they say111.gif



 


The out feed table should be a breeze.


jack
English machines




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Hi Jack,


Re the moulding function, I assume the work is passed through the thicknesser section of the machine ? if so how would


one ensure that the timber being moulded passes straight over the knives ? or have I got the system "brass" about.


 


Cheers Sam C



 
Larry Buskirk said:



J.,


He's here he's there he's everywhere, just like Sav Oir Faire!24.gif


Larry35.gif


Old machinery forum Host
J. Vibert said:




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