Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

The Patriot Woodworkers with Operation Ward 57 Adopt a Wounded Warrior Family for the Holidays - 2019 project is live, please click on link to view our very special annual project.

Sign in to follow this  
Ron Dudelston

I Need an Expert Opinion

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Ron is there a serial number or any number anywhere? I'm not seeing anything in the images that would indicate anything even as far as model. i think it would look great when all the rust is off of it. 

 


http://www.etsy.com/shop/nichollswoodworks

Edited by Larry Buskirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was my father in law's saw and he bought it used in the late 70's. 

The Craftsman decal has a 60's look to it Jim so you're probably not far off. 

I think Larry will be able to ID its age. I have a woodworking friend coming to visit so I'm making the barn "presentable."

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

James,

 

As far as replacing the tires there should not be a problem, they are available in both urethane and rubber.

From the parts diagram it appears that this unit uses bronze bushings, not bearings for the axle shafts.

From the photos that Ron supplied it looks like this machine has the often missing/damaged ( and hard to find ) blade guide parts.

 

Ron,

 

The guards can probably be repaired. There is a product called Muggy Weld that works with aluminum / pot metal.

Edited by Larry Buskirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

James,

 

Crowned tires have a slight arc that the blade rides on. Flat tires are just that flat.

Crowning of the tires normaly involves sanding or grinding the arc into the tire. Roughly a 4" radius.

The crowning is done so the blade will track to the center of the tire. It is also done to true the tire.

( Remove the high spots )

 

The better tires available today are supposedly more uniform in thickness, so should require a little less work to crown them.

 

There are several ways of doing it from using disc sanders to doing them on a lathe. If you Google it there will be hundreds of methods displayed.

 

I will be finding out when I get to replacing the tires on my Delta 785 10"  bandsaw. The Homecraft wheels that I am using have the crown built into the wheels. So I may be lucky and not have to crown the tires. 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...