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What did you do with your old cordless tools when you replaced it  by purchasing  a new one because it was cheaper than to replace the battery on the old one, which would no longer hold a charge and the batteries were Ni-cad?

Danl

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They go to the great workshop in the sky, via the local trash pickup. Not the batteries, they get recycled at Lowes.

Edited by Fred W. Hargis Jr

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I got tired of replacing the old 18v DeWalt NiCad batteries. The price was outrageous and they just didn't last. All of my DeWalts are stored away somewhere. I just couldn't bare to toss them.

 

I got a deal on a Ryobi Li Ion battery multitool pack. Since I use them for home/hobby shop use only I gave them a try. I have not been disappointed in the last 15 years with the decision. I can get a two pack of full sized Li Ion batteries for around $100 vs $85 for the one of the old DeWalt NiCads. Some of those Ryobi batteries are now 7-8 years old and still going strong. I have about a 1/2 dozen that are numbered and rotated in the tools as needed. They are used on a daily basis sometimes and can sit there for a couple of weeks at other times. I have NEVER had one bit of trouble with the tools. They have not quit, broken, or ever failed to function, and they do get used.

 

I will say this, I am NOT impressed with the circular saw or the reciprocating saw. They are functional and that is about it.

 

Most people are brand loyal. However, unless you are a commercial enterprise and constantly using a tool to the point of failure, I suspect, that, most folks only ever get experience with one brand or another only. Some of you might have two or more different battery powered tools in the shop. Great! You are one of the few who have legitimate comparative experience. I suspect, that, for most of us we stick to one brand or another so we maintain battery compatibility. I sure don't want to have several different battery chargers and different batteries to keep track of in the shop.

 

Do I miss my old 18v DeWalts? Maybe! If they had reliable and reasonably priced 18v batteries I might pull them back out. I haven't kept up with what is now available since I'm happy with my Ryobis.

Edited by schnewj

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14 minutes ago, schnewj said:

Do I miss my old 18v DeWalts? Maybe! If they had reliable and reasonably priced 18v batteries I might pull them back out. I haven't kept up with what is now available since I'm happy with my Ryobis.

I bought Li Ion batteries that replaced the Ni Cad batteries.  Came two batteries and a charger.  Love it.  They don't get used much in the winter but are ready to go come spring.

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8 minutes ago, HandyDan said:

I bought Li Ion batteries that replaced the Ni Cad batteries.  Came two batteries and a charger.  Love it.  They don't get used much in the winter but are ready to go come spring.

Ah, but there is the rub for me. I would have to buy a new charger and batteries. I haven't looked at the price of the Li Ion DW's but I will suspect, that, they are more per unit than I pay for the Ryobi batteries (~$50/ea. in the two pack).

 

I'm not dissing the DW's they are good tools. However, I not about to re-tool just to use more expensive batteries (I suspect) and buy a new charger. Basically, I'm committed to the Ryobis out of necessity. They are what I have, just like the DeWalts are what you have.

 

I thought I saw where the older DW 18v tools will accept the newer 20v Li Ions. I believe it, again, requires a charger upgrade. I am curious if anyone has any comparable experiences on the 18 vs 20v batteries and if the upgrade is worth doing and they work in the 18v tools. If there is a measurable improvement, then I might consider pulling my DeWalts back out. After all, like clamps and routers, you can never have enough battery powered tools, right?

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A few years ago, I ran across a Bosch circular saw on Ebay for $20. It looked like a corded saw in the picture,and I was looking for one at the time.

When it came, it was a battery operated, sans battery. So I trip over to Lowes to buy a new battery, they don't sell the NiCad anymore, only Bosch Li.

I come home and go on line, order 2 batteries and a charger, for $155.

One of my Dumber moments,  Duh...............................................

 

Herb

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Throw it away. If I ever have to replace the one I have now I will buy a Rigid. They have a lifetime warranty and free battery replacement for life.

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I thought I heard or read that Rigid was no longer offering lifetime replacements on the batteries. They were still honoring the old warranty, however. Any legitimate intell? If they still do offer the lifetime on everything, then it would certainly be worth consideration.

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After the batteries either rebuilt or otherwise renewed a few times I take the chuck off drills and discard the rest. For me it is only drills and have had 3 brands Craftsman (not recommended) , PC ( has lasted well but cannot say that for the nicad batt) and Milwaukee (12 V Lithium the high speed switch stopped working ) at this time one will have to die for me to invest in another.

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1 hour ago, schnewj said:

I thought I heard or read that Rigid was no longer offering lifetime replacements on the batteries.

My understanding is that if you buy the tool and battery as a kit, and register the tool and battery on the Lifetime Service Agreement, (and these are separate registrations, the battery is not automatically included with the tool as part of the tool's LSA), then yes, they offer lifetime replacement for that battery.  If, however, you buy the battery as a separate purchase, all you get is the regular warranty, and you cannot register it under the LSA.

 

I suspect that Ridgid decided the battery replacement was too expensive for them, because they are now offering the bare tool only, on some of their tools.  I bought the 7 1/4" circular saw as a bare tool, thinking I could use the 2ah battery from my Ridgid drill/driver.  It runs the saw, but doesn't have the power to cut through anything other than maybe 3/4" stock.  I'm waiting to get the 6ah battery they just came out with, but it isn't in the stores here yet.  Available online, but I can't use my military discount online.  I may have to go to the store and special order it.  When I get it, if I remember, I will post a comment on how the saw works with the stronger battery.

 

BTW, talking about preferences with cordless tools, I really like my Ridgid drill. 

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3 hours ago, schnewj said:

I thought I heard or read that Rigid was no longer offering lifetime replacements on the batteries. They were still honoring the old warranty, however. Any legitimate intell? If they still do offer the lifetime on everything, then it would certainly be worth consideration.

 https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-18-Volt-GEN5X-Cordless-Lithium-Ion-Combo-Kit-5-Tool-with-2-4-0Ah-HYPER-Lithium-Ion-Batteries-Charger-and-Bag-R9652/205883898 

 

It says Free repair and replace with registration.

 

 

Free batteries and service for life with registration

 

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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Several years ago I had Batteries + replace my NiCd cells with NiMh ones in my 14.4v DeWalt battery module. These new cells provide more amps and stay charged for much longer than the NiCd. I'm still using the DeWalt drill. The cost to change out two battery modules was $125.

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I take all my batteries  and used motor oil and  scraped lead paint and  dirty paint thinner and dump it in the reservouir. 

Makes the fish bigger

 

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My ex grew up next to a Creosote plant (which eventually became a superfund site). She always told me that she and her siblings ..."always thought that three eyed catfish were kinda neat"!

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11 hours ago, scarletjim said:

Several years ago I had Batteries + replace my NiCd cells with NiMh ones in my 14.4v DeWalt battery module. These new cells provide more amps and stay charged for much longer than the NiCd. I'm still using the DeWalt drill. The cost to change out two battery modules was $125.

That's a very good approach and one I used. it was a big improvement to go to the NiMH. I had always read that the NiCad chargers wouldn't fully charge the NiMh batteries, but it wasn't all that obvious to me. I used those tools/batteries for a long time before the NiMH gave out.

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The trouble with Ni Cad and MH batteries are that they take a "set". I was constantly fighting with my employees to run out the batteries on the Motorola two-way radios. If you only used 80% of the charge and you placed them in the chargers, the batteries would eventually learn, that, 20% charge equaled "0". They would eventually quit with 20% of the charge still in the battery. If they were now operating in the band between 20 and 100% and you placed them in the charger with power remaining it learned that the band was now, say between 30-100%. It became accumulative until they just would not operate. The narrower the band the less operating time they had.

 

I finally solved the problem by getting two new batteries for everyone. One was always in the charger. The second was left in the radios at the end of the shift with the volume turned all the way down and allowed to run out over night. They would then swap batteries in the morning and place the fully DISCHARGED battery in the charger. It effectively doubled the service life of the batteries. My nephew, a LEO on the local PD, said, they had the same problems with their Motorola Batteries. The PD implemented the two battery system and the replacement rate for the batteries dropped significantly.

 

Armed with that experience, I always ran out the batteries on my DeWalts. However, I wonder how many users do the same. I'm willing to bet, that, the minute these types of batteries start to loose power they get plopped into the charger. The batteries don't necessarily go "bad" they just slowly loose the ability to take a full charge or deliver the charge that is in the battery.

 

What is great about the Li Ion is, that, they provide full power until they fully discharge and then just plain quit. No, memory, no set, longer life, and in my opinion, a little more power. The downside, they can't be rebuilt like the Ni Cad and NiMH batteries.

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I do the same as you..

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