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FWIW...

Here is a response provided by the top Freud tech guy a number of years ago.

 

All Freud blades come from the same machines in the same manufacturing plant. We make our own micrograin carbide in numerous formulations that represent various degrees of hardness. The carbide is selected depending on the intended application (the hardest is used for laminates the softest for ripping) as are the tooth angles and tooth quantity. The steel for the blade plates is all the same grade. The brazing is all the same. The key differences between the 3 main lines of Freud blades are:

 

The LU/LM Industrial blades have the thickest tips for the most resharpenings and are generally full kerf. We also offer the most selection of specialty blades in this line. These have the most appeal to professionals who need to get a lot of sharpenings out of a blade and to artisans who need specialty blades for their projects.

 

The TK and Diablo lines are very similar. Both are thin kerf blades and the tip thickness is the same. The key difference is in the way we market these blades. The Diablo line has blades intended for purposes like framing, siding, decking and general home improvement and is packaged and promoted in ways that appeal to contractors and DIYers. The TK line has blades for similar purposes (as well as laminate blades) but is sold with different or no coating and different packaging and POP material to appeal more to woodworkers.

 

Do professional woodworkers shop for blades at Home Depot? Probably some do and they can get excellent performance from a Diablo blade for a lot of their uses but with a shorter overall life (and lower cost) due to the tip thickness. Same with the TK blades at Lowe's.

 

Why not compare a TK or Diablo blade to Forrest? Consider this analogy: Toyota cars and Lexus cars share a lot of the same components and are made by the same company. Would you compare a Camry with a BMW?

 

We make a fourth line of blades (F400 Premier series) that is very similar to the WWII and is priced similarly. The difference between ours and Forrest's is that ours is made by computer controlled, super modern equipment and theirs is made by hand. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages but I leave the final verdict to the consumer.

 

Charles M

Freud, Inc.

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I think they may have renamed the 10" version to a P410 Fusion.

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I turn mostly and a blade last a long time for me.  I like to have a good one around for those occasions when I do flat work.  If I buy a blade every 10 years I am good with that.  The Forest would have lasted longer but I got lazy at changing it out for crappy wood.

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FWIW, the latest issue of FWW (March/Apr 2018) rated 10" combo table saw blades. The winners were Freud Premier Fusion P410, Forest Woodworker II and Ridge Carbide TS2000. They compared blades from nine manufactures. Tested both rip and crosscuts in pine and cherry and rip speed in 8/4 maple. Also tested cuts in plywood. Not sure if the mag is on the stands yet but I get the electronic copy.

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Anyone have experience with the Ridge Carbide blades mentioned above?   They are selling the ts2000 10" for $89 as part of the woodworking rosd show specials.  This is a full kerf blade.    The thin kerf is $10 more.   Looks like they have an ultra version thats a 48 tooth blade.

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The only one I ever had was for an RAS I owned. My memory of it was that it was very expensive ($120, with a discount) and it was extremely high quality...it was the RS1000, if I recall. Good thick carbide and cut very smooth. Stayed sharp forever. I bought it because it was the only 9" blade I could find for my small Dewalt RAS, and it had a 2º hook angle which made it at least acceptable for that saw. Ridge is generally known for high quality stuff and it's all US made (at least it was a few years back).

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I have a Ridge Carbide blade and have had very good luck with it. Got it at a woodworking show. My experience with both a Forrest and a Ridge says they're pretty much equal. Stumpy Nubs recommends them and has a discount for Ridge blades but not probably as good as the woodworking show price. They are made in the US in the state of New Jersey.

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Thanks all.    May pick one up at the show next weekend and give it a spin.

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