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John Morris

MWTCA January 2018 "What's It" Project

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No. 63 Low Angle Jack Plane Woodriver.jpgGrand Prize

We are proud to offer a Woodriver No. 63 Low Angle Jack Plane to this months "What's It" winner. This months "What's It" is sponsored by our supporter Woodcraft Supply.

 

Originally advertised as a plane for heavy stock removal across the grain, the No. 62 has found a home as a smoother and is quite popular among collectors. The WoodRiver® No. 62 is faithful to the original design, but is almost a full pound heavier at approximately 4.6 lbs. It features a body cast from ductile iron, with a bed angle of 12°, a bubinga tote and front knob, and a high-carbon steel blade with a 25° bevel. The plane measures a little less than 14" in length x 2-7/16" in width and has a 2"-wide blade. (Value $205.00)

 

"What's It" Basic Rules Reminder

(For a full run down on this project and rules please go to: "The Patriot Woodworker and MWTCA "What's It" project")

  • Only Patriot Woodworker Members are eligible to participate and receive the award.
  • The MWTCA only accepts a verified source to support your answer, so one should be submitted with your answer, such as a patent, catalog entry, tool book reference, or a respectable website on the subject. Do not let these requirements prevent you from having fun and submitting educated answers on the subject without verification, we can worry about references later. All answers are welcome, as well as healthy debates regarding "What's It".
  • If a verified and referenced answer is not arrived at by the end of each month's "What's It" project, a random draw will be performed for a "One Year MWTCA Club Membership".
  • Only Patriot Woodworker's who participate in this "What's It" topic will be included in the random draw.

 

Ok ladies and gentlemen, we now have our January "What's it" live and ready!

The image(s) below is a MWTCA "What's It" image for you to research, and tell us all here in this topic post, just what the heck is it!

 

Project details

No further information provided, what you see, is what you have.

Remember, "What's It" is not always woodworking related!

 

650.jpg

 

650a.jpg

 

650b.jpg

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It is a handle for a special teeter totter

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2 minutes ago, Chips N Dust said:

It is a handle for a special teeter totter

Well shucks, Kelly. You went and spilled the beans.:(:lol:

Edited by Gene Howe

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Could be a part of something too gents, and ladies!

Looks like something that handles line, or rope. By itself, or a part of another mechanism or machine. Hmmm

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Both sides appear to be the same, same two dowels, same wheel mechanism. 

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Definitely a variation of a barb wire stretcher.

 

The wire goes into the wheel, through the two dowels and the "toe" of the tool is placed on the post. The stretcher is then levered using the post as the fulcrum point and stretching the wire taught while the wire is tacked to the post. I've used similar configurations, but there were hundreds of variations of this same tool. Good luck finding the specific patent.

 

In the case of this tool, I'm going to guess that a rope was used on the tool and attached to the wire itself.

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Due to the look of the pulley I am thinking it was used in conjunction with a snatch block to move items to heavy to move without extra leverage.  The pins would keep the rope in line with the pulley.

 

image.png.348c474c47a1385749e5fe4dac7b79ce.png

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24 minutes ago, schnewj said:

Definitely a variation of a barb wire stretcher.

That was my first guess too Bill, but took the "low road answer" instead. After reading your description, I looked again and could see where the rope might route through the pulleys and guides with one end connecting to the wire and the other end tied off to a corner or brace post for leverage. This one is missing the clamp portion which attached to one end of the rope, then to the barb wire. Similar to the picture below which is similar to the style we used...

 

I suppose it could be a form of an electric fence wire stretcher also which would work similar to the barb stretcher...

 

image.png.00e198b04df980559d00798f670f76c3.png

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I used almost the exact same one as that one above, Dave!

Edited by schnewj

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7 minutes ago, schnewj said:

I used almost the exact same one as that one above, Dave!

So now you know what happened to it! :rolleyes:

John

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1 hour ago, p_toad said:

like these?

I think I still have a piece of one somewhere; the white color.

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