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Cliff

DANGEROUS PAINT~On Harbor Freight Tools

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Whatever poisonous garbage the Chinese are putting on Harbor frieght chisels is dangerous stuff.

I smoked just a little of it off welding the bases of  their 4" brick chisels.  The stuff made my shop all smoky    and like when one burns rubber there were weird floaties of black goo floating in the air.

 

Then the sickness set in.  My throat became terribly raw and I have sinus issues.

 

I've never had a paint do this. I can't even guess what  they used.

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high lead content....

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what is the chance of getting a sample tested???

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I those chisels were zinc coated, the welding operation may have made it vaporize. Dangerous stuff!

 

http://theodoregray.com/periodictable/ZincSafety.html

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21 minutes ago, Cliff said:

then it'd cause flue like symptoms..

 

agree w/ the zinc...

milk and a lot of it is the help you need...

if it settles in your kidneys you'll real have some issues...

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I am not so sure on the zinc.  The few times I have welded around zinc caused a white smoke - IIRC.

Welding primer is high in zinc and made for priming prior to the welding operation.

I think Stick's first reply with lead is more likely,

Cal

17067.jpg

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lead is cheaper than zinc...

the chinese are notorious for their use of lead paint and will use it on your children's toys w/o ever giving it a thought...... 

and this is is HF we're talking about...

side effects/affects from lead are way worse than from zinc ya know...

 

one of these days I'm going to show up at HF w/ my lead test kit and Geiger counter....

 

 

EPA-Recognized Lead Test Kits

EPA has recognized three lead test kits for use in complying with the RRP rule. They are the 3M™ LeadCheck™, D-Lead®, and the State of Massachusetts lead test kits.

3M™ LeadCheck™. EPA recognizes that when used by a Certified Renovator, the 3M™ LeadCheck™ lead test kit can reliably determine that regulated lead-based paint is not present on wood, ferrous metal (alloys that contain iron), or drywall and plaster surfaces. Obtain the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) lead test kit laboratory evaluation report. Also obtain the 3M™ LeadCheck™ laboratory evaluation report (PDF) . Certified renovators seeking to use the 3M™ LeadCheck™ test kit for purposes of meeting requirements in the RRP rule can purchase the 3M™ LeadCheck™ test kits from either 3M™ LeadCheck™ directly or from certain retail outlets. To order a 3M™ LeadCheck™ test kit call 800-494-3552 or contact 3M™ at leadcheck.com.

D-Lead®. Based on the results of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) report of vendor-submitted lead test kits, EPA recognizes that when used by a Certified Renovator, the D-Lead® paint test kit manufactured by ESCA Tech, Inc., can reliably determine that regulated lead-based paint is not present on wood, ferrous metal (alloys that contain iron), or drywall and plaster surfaces. Obtain the EPA environmental technology verification report on the D-Lead® test kit (PDF) . Certified renovators seeking to use the D-Lead® paint test kit for purposes of meeting requirements in the RRP rule can purchase it from certain distributors and retail outlets. Locate a distributor or retailer at www.esca-tech.com/Distributors.php, or call 414-962-3006.

State of Massachusetts. EPA recognizes that when used by trained professionals, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts lead test kit can reliably determine that regulated lead-based paint is not present on drywall and plaster; it is not recognized for use on wood and ferrous metal (alloys that contain iron) surfaces. Obtain the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) lead test kit laboratory evaluation report.

Read a fact sheet on the EPA-recognized lead test kits (PDF) .

For any questions pertaining to the recognition of these kits, contact the National Lead Information Center.

 

Lead Test Kit Environmental Technology Verification

EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program has completed its verification of the performance of four vendor-submitted lead test kits developed to meet the negative response and positive response performance criteria for improved lead test kits set forth under the 2008 RRP Rule.

Based on the ETV results, there are no kits that have met both the negative response and positive response criteria requirements; however, there is one kit that met only the negative response criterion (D-Lead®), and it was recognized for use as a negative response-only kit on August 31, 2010.

Get the individual lead test kit verification reports and a description of the ETV lead test kit verification program.

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59 minutes ago, Cliff said:

Guess I  gotta just go shoot myself.

So long cruel world.

 

 

do one better...

shoot the decision maker that ordered up the paint that was used...

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2 minutes ago, Cliff said:

I'd have to go to China.

 

 

 

sub contract....

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On 12/29/2017 at 6:59 PM, Stick486 said:

high lead content....

That's my guess too.

Like Cal, zinc usually gives off toxic white smoke...neither's good regardless

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49 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

That's my guess too.

Like Cal, zinc usually gives off toxic white smoke...neither's good regardless

 

lead is way cheaper  too...

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lots of plastics and polymers used in paint. I've seen that floating black stuff in burning plastic (don't ask, i'll deny everything.)

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