Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Fred Wilson

Scrolling Straight Lines ?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

WOW - 18 views and nobody has had a comment?  And I thought we ALL had different ideas and how to keep those lines straight.  Even an "I agree" would help.

 

Oops, noticed that we DID have a couple of replies but for some reason they are not showing up.  John Morris, what happened?

Edited by Fred Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fred, I am not sure what is happening! It appears there is one comment now. Did you accidentally hit the delete post button?:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope - was notified on my browser that Lew and another guy had left posts and when I went to view them there was nothing there.  Didn't even register on the "Views" counter.  Oh, well, to error is human, to really screw things up it takes a computer !  :wacko:

Thanks, John, for the reply.  And thanks Wichman for your post

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I'm just now getting my belly down to where I can again sit in the chair here in front of the computer.

 

I've probably given my take on running the saw straight maybe more than anyone or it seems like it.

 

Practice practice practice.  And no,  if a person uses spiral blades for a few years then later switches to regular scroll saw blades all that previous spiral blade use has been wasted...This is two completely different procedures  where one won't help the other...... The only help is knowing where the switch is....

 

'The largest blade size I use is a # 5 either an Olson precision ground blade or a Flying Dutchman #5. Either one cuts a straight line when still being sharp.

 

A person should always position themselves to the right side of the blade.

 

When the blade starts getting too dull it will start wandering.

 

Hardwood is easier to cut straight lines than using some pine boards.

 

I always cut the same direction meaning I always spin the wood clockwise as I am sawing.

 

Practice cutting circles, 1/2 to 2" range with a small size blade and see if the plug will slide out either direction. If it won't you are pushing the blade sideways as you are sawing. When you can do this to your satisfaction then go to lots of ins and outs while cutting circles. You will find the insides will come out easier if all the sawing was in the same direction.  Which way for one to go is determined by that person doing lot of practice runs.

 

If I order plans I always print up a few copies and file the original away in case I want more of the same item later.

 

Never ever use the original pattern even if you have to go to a printer in town .

 

Okay I  find a picture of a clock with lots of carving. I print it and send it to Rapid Resizer because the original picture prints out only 3" tall and I would want it to be somewhere around 20" tall. Once it is in my computer and on Rapid resizer I crop it as large as I can get it then change the dimensions to suit then print. It comes out 4 pages, sometimes 6, sometimes 8 pages depending on how large I want. The paper shows  where to cut the excess off then tape it together...I bring this up because tomorrow or the next day the same printer might or might not make the same exact size picture... I took printed out plans with me to Colo for the three months stay in the summer and screwed up a couple pages of one of the scroll saw jewelry boxes I made that year....I took the original pattern I had printed out some of in Texas before we left. Those scroll saw boxes takes 10 exact same pages of drawings of one section. Then when I have 8 pages cut out I can start gluing them up for the body of the jewelry box..Like I said, I screwed up 2 pages so I went to South Fork and had 4 more pages printed of the same pattern but only needed 2 pages at that time. Got back to the scroll saw and cut out one of the patterns and I could not use it with the others I had already sawed out. Their printer and my printer made completely different size patterns . I always thought all printers would make the same size but they don't... Long story to say always use the same printer on the the same day for my printer won't do the same each day...

 

I would not recommend the three legged contraption Dewalt sells for their scroll saws to be mounted on. Its stressful enough to sit in a comfortable swivel chair but to stand up for long periods of time and saw straight lines, no. My saw sits on the table with pieces of intertubes under the saw. Not bolted down and does not vibrate.

 

    When I draw out a pattern using the french curved set I use the thinnest line drawing pencil I can find...I want my blade to run in the exact middle of that line and completely do away with it. Trying to stay on either side of the line  I don't recommend because the question comes up as just how far away or how close should I go. So stay so you have  the same amount of blade on each side and you will turn into a better scroll saw controller..the middle of the line is the middle. I use to go to the side of the line and I found myself going on one side then when I got to the other side of the pattern my blade was going on the other side. Confusing that's for sure.

 

Also if that pattern is too big for my printer I take it to town for them to make a few copies.

 

I am always asked how long do you get one blade to last....I can tell when my control starts going away so I change the blade. Buying them by the gross makes them reasonable so I don't worry about how long they last. I  only use 3 blades ever so cost is not worried about.  

 

Lots of things goes into blades lasting. How thick the wood is. How fast are you running the saw. Are you letting the saw cut on it own , are you forcing it to go faster. If you don't have enough time to take your time, forget it and go watch a soap opera!

 

I hate to say it but most of these books on scroll saw patterns are made to make money and not especially to help a person for when he goes to make such an item from that book if you happen to enlarge anything for no one item suits everybody on the exact size and when you go and enlarge that picture the line turns into something 1/8" wide and completely unsuitable for scroll sawing...My solution is get one of those large size books of graph paper at a printing supply along with a set of french curves at that same printing supply and using the scroll saw books draw up your own patterns with a really fine pencil lead.

 

If you are stack cutting, multiple pieces at the same time, like 5 pieces of 1/8" baltic birch, use wax paper between each piece of wood and you will see the difference on how long it makes your blades last..

 

I use small nails for attaching pieces of wood with a wide head and leave the head sticking up a little so my fingers can rest on it and guide the slick wood better, then easier to pull apart when finished cutting. Nails in the .020 size.

 

Danl that's how you ended up with two sets of the 12 days of Christmas , By the way I still have the original patterns! Only thing, inflation has set in around Breckenridge.

 

Also the clear packing tape I use on top of the wood along with the spray stickum sprayed on top of the tape also lubes the blades and makes them last longer.

 

And one of the most important thing using clear packing tape.....Scotch brand tape is the only one for sure that does not leave sticky crap all over the wood when its time to pull the tape off... I can't say one way or the other about 3 M but I would think it might be good also...The last time I bought tape was many years ago for Scotch brand came in a 10 or 12 pack and when I ran out the other day we bought a 10 pack of Duck brand and it is really a head ache leaving half its sticky on the wood,  terrible..

  

Top feeding or bottom, it don't matter as long as you can get going in a reasonable time.

 

If you can't see the line clearly then get the swivel flex magnifying thingy to see your lines better. There are probably more things that is important but running out of paper right now is more so. Bye

Edited by Smallpatch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Fred Wilson said:

Nope - was notified on my browser that Lew and another guy had left posts and when I went to view them there was nothing there.  Didn't even register on the "Views" counter.  Oh, well, to error is human, to really screw things up it takes a computer !  :wacko:

Thanks, John, for the reply.  And thanks Wichman for your post

 

Perhaps they left comments on another topic you participated in Fred. Hmmm, interesting, hey, you are ok! You are not going crazy! Remember, our online community software that makes up The Patriot Woodworker was created by "HUMANS"! And what do we get with creations that are created by humans, faulty and glitchy! Thanks Fred for your patience, I am so happy to see things perking up in the Scroll Sawing Forums!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patch, great post - thank you - and yes, we have discussed it before but I still get questions regarding it.

Forgot about trying to cut straight with spiral (don't use them and that's probably why I didn't include them)

You mentioned using a #5 to cut the lines and watch out for wander - My opinion, the smaller the blade the easier to wander (unless there's a really good song coming out of the speakers) :rolleyes:

I can add to your last line, I use TWO lights above my table and slightly forward of the table edge.  This gives me a triangle shadow where the blade meets the wood.  (another humble opinion)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice is what is needed. I really do not have any problems with straight lines or circles any more. Years of practice I guess. If the wood you are scrolling has heavy grain in it it could give you problems and fits. Not much can be done because that small thin blade is going to follow the grain. I will say this I find the key is steady and slow. remembering it is a marathon and not a sprint. I just cut some maple today that is 1-3/4" thick and I am cutting both curves and straight lines and I apply the same principles except that it is even slower. Had to bump up to a #9 blade which I hadn't used in quite some time. My go to blade is #5. One thing I always do is stop pushing let the piece relax in case there was any sideward pressure it realigns. Scrolling is still fun after all these years. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JT - thanks for chiming in - I agree with you completely.  We always have some "newbies" on the forum and I think it's always a good idea to bring up topics like this one from time to time.  Somewhere I have a document where I have collected "tips" over the years.  If I can find it I will publish/upload it here.

 

ps - welcome back

Edited by Fred Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Fred. Just poking around a few forums. Pretty cold here so the ambition level is low to go into shop. It is always good to restate some of the tricks we have learned over the years and share with new and oldies. Never know we may pick up a gem or one of those why did I not think of that moments. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


About us

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our veterans and active duty both here in the United States and in Canada, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. So please, join us! Please click on Join The Patriot Woodworker's.

 

We support MWTCA, preserving tools and implements from the past.

M-WTCA Logo.gif

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

Visit us on Facebook

×