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Guys, this is the next project on the list. It's a corner cabinet it will be 28" tall and about 18" wide, I have sketched out a full size drawing with the corner angles does this look like the best way to build this unit? 

corner cabinet layout.jpg

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Many years ago, I built a china closet with a very similar design. It was a project from Woodsmith. Let me see if I can fin the issue and look at how the carcass was constructed. I seem to remember some 22.5° angles.

 

It was in Woodsmith No. 61.

 

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yes...

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@Pat Meeuwissen, you have 45's all the way around the cabinet, since the angle is reduced further at the front face frame of the cabinet, those angles should be 22.5 degrees, you are reducing the 45 by half for the front. Hope this helps.

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I think the OP's sketch is correct - the angle between the two "backs" is 90° to match the corner of the room, and the "sides" are shown as 90° to the wall, so the corners of the cabinet are all 90°. You don't get to a 45° until you get to the face frame joint - it was easier for me to make all the (plywood) case pieces with 90° edges and cut a 45° only on the outside, back corner of the stile. Easy to make the top/bottom panels and the shelves as they're just a square of the appropriate dimension with a 45° clip on the outside corner - I carefully laid out the first one and then used it as a template to make the others.

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@tomp, I see it now, you are correct!

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Guys, I made up some scrap pieces and decided that the front corners which are visible with the return I changed to (2) 22.5 degree angles where it attaches to the face frame pieces. I could have left it like in my drawing but it would have shown the seam and not as easy to join.

 

My next question is relative to when these were antiques, how would they join these corners? The unseen sections I'm thinking probably got glue and some small (cut) nails. Face frame would have been mortise and tenon as well as the door?? I'm going to use splines on the 45 and 22.5 degree corners. 

 

Any other info would be very welcome. Pat

Edited by Pat Meeuwissen
spelling

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I used to live in old houses and those were always built in.  They joined them wth a Dado in the sides and the shelves were fixed.  Then the face frame went on and hid the dadoes just like the pictures above.  They were also 90% painted to match the trim.  The only woodgraine one I ever saw was bassword with birch plywood shelves and had the face of the shelve covered up with some thin veneer so when the door was open you thought it was solid. Also because the houses were rarely plumb nor square the back was cut off like your plan and the sides had a trim molding the actual cabinet was 1/4" away from the walls.  OH also becuase of the size and strength of the ply the ply was only 3/8" T.   Unless you are storing weights in there 3/8" should work fine but I'd probably go with 1/2" or 3/4" given todays reduced strength.   I had to disamble several to refinish them . 

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Apprentice, thank you for your input it is really appreciated. I'm using this build as an excercise for how it would have been build years ago and trying to stay away from plywood. I found a copy of an old article which has real good info. I am using power tools but trying to make joinery like they would have.

https://books.google.com/books?id=h_sDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA18&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false

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That's going to be a very nice piece. Those instructions are nicely detailed. Thanks for posting them. You gonna use pine?

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Yes Gene, I'm not following the article exactly but using it for inspiration. I have a few sub assemblies already in the clamps and glued. I cut splines on the angles and it really helps with alignment. I used an old trick for getting a bead on the edge, the screw in a piece of wood run the stock, once the groove was established I turned to my shoulder plane and made them deeper. 

I hope my sharing my experiences will help other beginners, I learn something with every project. Special clamping cauls with 45's cut into them to put pressure on the seams and piececes of wood to capture the entire assembly. Will post some pics when I get them out of the clamps.

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Love those cauls and that scratch stock. Did you sharpen that screw head?

And, those splines are a great idea for keeping those angles aligned. I'm sure they'll be stronger, too. It looks like you used hardboard. That's what I use.

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I did sharpen the screw head, it really gives it a more handmade feeling when using it.

Yes I did use hardboard the consistent dimension of it was perfect for this application. 

 

I'm looking for some really dark paste wax, to finish this, who makes a good product? I also have a bunch of powdered tints could I mix this into a dark brown butcher's wax? 

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For the dark paste wax you can use shoe polish. If you do not want to use that (much cheaper) the Briwax that Lew pointed to is a good product.

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I love my Bison, http://www.liberon.co.uk/product/wax-polish-black-bison-paste/

I think it's some of the best wax out there, well of course I do, I use it! :) But really, it leaves a deep lustrous finish and depending on which color you choose, you can change the color of your wood. I really like it. And it smells great!

Wax-Polish-Black-Bison-150ml.jpg

 

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lookin' good Pat...

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