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I believe it would be of interest to many of us to see a NEW PLACE TO HONE IN ON.  I see where hammer and chisels are used to cut'm. Others have JIGS THEY HAVE SOLD OR GIVEN AWAY. Most of us can join anything. 

But dovetailing is a thing of beauty + it impresses the lady customers + they are so strong (dovetails)& durable.

WAL GUESS I better git outa heaw and go check the still, tryin ta git 1 more cooking , fore the weather turns cold.. Cya

 

s ago

In my lifetime of woodworking, paw built truck bodies when I wuz little. Still remember 1/4'' bolts, nuts & washers, the 'speed handle w/socket to fit those 1/4'' nuts, bolted on sidebody 1X4's. The way the two ''sills' 4X6 were cut out to fit the hump in truck frame over rear axle. Paw cut'm out w/foot azz, so they fit down solid and then bolted down with piece of metal over the sill and one underneath the truck frame, with two long bolts at each, four to /for each truck body. Usually smidgen higher/taller that truck cab. Sometime customer wanted about two foot higher sections, that could be slipped down into original/everyday bodies, to haul livestock or ear corn. 

*****Foot azz is grubbing hoe type thing with a crocked handle, bout 30 something inches long. This is all I know to call/name it. Prolly aint made anymore for sale. Blade bout 4'' wide.

alright if ya made it this far, I love lathe, building Cedar chest, picture frames, etc., etc.

****2007 started writing, named all books Wiregrass, Grits & 1.MURDER, 2.FOGGY HORSESHOE,3.GHOST DANCER,4.SECOND CHANCE--all  about a yankee that came south, stayed raised a family.

Then one little stand alone called WIREGRASS AND GRITS, 5.For boys only.

Not a dirty/off color word in any ov'm.

btw, Amazon has one of these for $50 something.  Cya

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Like many of us, "Norm" peaked our interest in woodworking although I had been at it a lot longer. Norm taught me techniques. When I saw him doing dovetails with a Porter Cable dovetailing jig, I saw how perfectly they fit together and their symmetry. Of course I "had" to have one of those, including all of the various style adapters! Later, Norm starting using the Leigh dovetailing jig. Wow you could make dovetails that were not evenly spaced but still symmetrical. So I bought the Porter Cable attachment that did the same thing. I was set! I made dovetails! 

 

The problems then reared their ugly heads. What Norm never mentioned was that it took, what seemed to be forever, to set up the jig. Centering, depth, spacing, test, repeat. Even with lots of home made setup jigs an hour or so was spent just getting ready. The dovetails were perfect but not "pretty". I was left wanting something more. 

 

At some point, I decided to attempt hand cutting the dovetails. What a miserable failure! It was obvious I was missing something. As luck would have it, this was just about the time I went from dial-up to high speed Internet. This opened up a whole new world for me. So many resources "out there". I'm a visual learner. I need to "see" what to do. I don't read. Google was my friend and YouTube became my best buddy. Now I could see how it was done. Of course, I had to learn the hard way that not everyone on YouTube was the expert they claimed to be and there was more than one "correct" way to accomplish hand cut dovetails. Pins first, tails first, gents saw, dovetail saw,  Japanese saw, line thickness, pencil, marking knife, marking gauges, spacing, chisel this way, chisel that way- so many choices!

 

I finally settled on a single technique- marking gauge, marking knife, Japanese pull saw, tails first and sharp chisels (I'm still trying to perfect the spacing/layout to create "visually pleasing" designs). I don't have a lot of muscular coordination so accurately sawing the dovetail lines is my biggest challenge. Before making any project, I set up a practice piece and just cut, following lines to a marked depth. After a few minutes, I can usually make consistent cuts.

 

My old Porter Cable dovetailing jig now gaters dust in a corner of the shop. It hasn't been used for years. I should sell it.

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I want a 24 inch'un. Gonna try'm on corners of blanket chest(cedar chest).

Wal at my age,68, aint gonna git one no younger.

Got a lit'lun(sears) used it on jewelry boxes, neat.  Cya

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I got a "Universal Joiner"    In the demo, it looked neat.   It took me 3 days so sit down and figure out how it worked.   You have spacers you have to add in one of a number of different holes and spacer diameter based on half-pins, half-tails, one of each, and how big they are.   And you have to flip the template and potentially pick a different hole and spacer for the other half of the tails.   And if it's more than about 6", you have to pick a new set of holes/spacer for the second half of the set.   And it makes 2" o/c and 3" o/c pins (but you can get 1.5" o/c with a new set of holes/spacers).  In addition to a large manual with my notes in the margins and cross references, I have some class notes and a cheat-sheet I made for myself.   You can also (easily!?) have a skipped pin if you want that look.   I cannot imagine any other dovetail jig being as complex as this one.

 

My philosophy has always been, "Every time you need to make a change in a setting, it gives you the opportunity to make a mistake."

 

I think I've finally had enough of it.  I'm trying to keep in practice with hand-cut.

 

The inventor / owner finally retired and closed the business, thankfully no one else will have to endure this product.

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I can't explain myself here. I can only tell you  what I did. 

First I built a rig to do DT Keys on my Slider using my router  table I built off the slider's rear.   It was a lit of wood (2" thick maple) to get the thing flex proof but it worked fine. I just hated the noise of the router bit with that big cut.

I got a bug up my tail to  include DTs in my repertoire and got an Omnijig and then a Leigh D4.  I tried 'em both and hated 'em instantly. I mean hate hate hate.    The noise the sawdust the bouncing around of the router It all felt too out of control. So I hung 'em up telling myself that I'd figure it out later.

 

Still got 'em.  Don't think I'll use 'em.  Want one? Make me an offer.

 

Then at some point I started watching vids on hand cut DTs. Ohh they do such a good job making it look both easy and hard at the same time.

Well I got fed up on the sidelines; so I  just set about doing it and  - - it was really a lot easier than I imagined.

 Sawed and chopped is my method.  I tell myself that one day I'll get a blade for my TS ground on an angle so I can do them in the TS like I do finger joints. but I haven't yet.

 

Meanwhile there is a Mortise & Tenon magazine article ( issue #2) on DTs over history.  They did a pretty good job demystifying the things. Showed lots  of pics of Masterworks DTs in antiques and  - - - - you know what??  They are horrible.  They did a pretty rigorous survey of lots and lots of antiques with hand cut DTs and the majority of them look like some junior apprentice's first go at them.

So chipper up  girls.  The ancient masters   really stunk at it.

 

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Cliff said:

So chipper up  girls.  The ancient masters   really stunk at it.

:lol::lol:

 

A high school friend collects antiques. He was also an auto body/collision repair business owner with a reputation for quality work/painting. He once told me the same thing about the old dovetails. Strong joint but made fast and sloppy. His remarks were pretty much the same as yours, Cliff.

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I learned hand cut dovetails about 16 years ago from a old magazine called Woodcuts by the owner of Lee Valley. Ok so then I could say I had done it. Well a few years ago I bought a Omnijig from a widow. Well i found a Youtube for it and wrote on the jig the instructions which were not in the book. Now is not too hard to setup. That jig is built like a tank.

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On ‎10‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 10:27 PM, Gerald said:

That jig is built like a tank.

If that's the same one I have, it is a big red monster.  When not cutting dovetails, it could also double as a boat anchor in a hurricane.

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1 hour ago, PostalTom said:

If that's the same one I have, it is a big red monster.  When not cutting dovetails, it could also double as a boat anchor in a hurricane.

That's the one!

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Love my Keller jig. Very simple, and the length is endless, for obvious reasons. I had a blast with these chests. 

I have the model 1601, Dad purchased it back in the mid 80's, he gave it to me. The image below is the Keller website image, I was looking for a pic of mine in use but can't find one.

Model-main-1601-lg.jpg

 

 

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I've owned and used a Craftsman, PC and a Keller jig. Not overly enamoured with any of them. Lately, I've been using an aluminum jig that cuts dovetail recesses in the corners after assembly. Then, matching keys are inserted. It can be repositioned so the DTs can be any where you want them. And, the corners can be lapped as well as mitered. 

Sadly, the guy who made them passed away and that jig is no longer available. But, Infinity sells one based on his design. Mine was a good deal less expensive. However, the versatility is worth the cost, IMHO.

 

 

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I bought a cheap Craftsman jig first. I spent two nights trying to decipher the manual and get a good joint. No luck whatsoever, very frustrating. I sold it to some sucker at a yard sale for $10. Next I bought the Keller. Wow that was a game changer. Easy to set up and use and even though the jig is 16" you can index it easily enough and use it to cut wider joints. If I remember right you can use it on thicker stock up to 1" thick as well but if I'm wrong you can only use it on 3/4" stock. I had that for a few years then one year at The Woodworking Show I saw Jim Heavey demo Porter Cables 1412 jig. They had a show special on it and I walked out of the show with one in hand. I can cut joints up to 12" wide including through, half blind, rabbited half blind, sliding dovetails and dados. Set up is fairly straightforward and the manual is easy to follow. it says you can work stock up to 1" thick but that is pushing it. Right out of the box and a couple of pieces of scrap later I was cutting through and half blind dovetails.  Granted it cant cut anything wider than 12" but for drawers it's hard to beat. 

I've been contemplating experimenting on making a wider jig based on my Keller jig. I have some wide UMHW plastic stock and am thinking if I used a flush trim bit that I could cut one out twice as wide as the Keller. Basically I would position the Keller Jig on the stock, screw it down to hold it in place then rout it. Remove the jig index it down the line then cut another pass. 

The one drawback of the Keller is that if you are working the ends of a long panel you will need work up high with your router.

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On 10/22/2017 at 5:01 PM, olbuck said:

I want a 24 inch'un. Gonna try'm on corners of blanket chest(cedar chest).

Wal at my age,68, aint gonna git one no younger.

Got a lit'lun(sears) used it on jewelry boxes, neat.  Cya

GOOD GRIEF, I'M 78 NOT 68

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1 hour ago, olbuck said:

GOOD GRIEF, I'M 78 NOT 68

Happened overnight, did it? I know the feeling. :(

John

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18 hours ago, olbuck said:

GOOD GRIEF, I'M 78 NOT 68

:lol::D:lol:...

Don't ya' just hate it when that happens?:P

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