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kmealy

Do we really need all these cordless tools?

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OK, if you are a roofer or plumber working in obscure places without power, sure.   But does the world's DIYer really need all these cordless tools -- routers, table saws, chain saws,  jig saws, recip saws?  What does a new 32V battery replacement cost?  And what happens when it gives out two cuts before you are done?

 

I have a drill-driver because I'm often working in someone's home and don't want to have to string extension cords all over the place.  And most of the time I'm driving screws that don't work all that well with a corded drill.   But in the shop, I'm rarely more than 6' from an outlet.

 

A number of years ago, there was a trim carpenter working in the home where I was.   He had a battery powered brad nailer.   I have a compressor that weighs about 25 lb and hoses are no problem when I'm working in one or two adjacent rooms.  Even if I have to unplug it, I can do a door frame on the tank.   And I don't have to wait for the "bam, whizzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz, click, ..."   (onomatopoeia)

 

 

 

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/reviews/g1358/12-great-tool-gifts-for-diyers/?slide=1&src=socialflowFB

Edited by kmealy (see edit history)

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I really like the conscience of them.  I have the Dewalt set I used when I made my living as a handyman for a few years.  A little over a year ago I upgraded the batteries to lithium since the originals had gone bad.  It was to the tune of a couple hundred but considered it money well spent.  I also have a 12V Hitachi set.  I would replace them if something ever happened to them.  I really like the freedom from a cord.  I can go anywhere around the house or yard and not have to carry a chord and worry where to plug it in.  Having a cordless circular saw, jig saw and reciprocating saw is a must too.   

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I think they went overboard, I saw a cordless miter saw somewhere. I also think the answer may be different for a hobbyist versus a pro. I have a few drills and a few drivers, otherwise I'm corded. (oops, forgot the jobsite radio).

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1 hour ago, HandyDan said:

I really like the convenience of them.  I have the Dewalt set I used when I made my living as a handyman for a few years.  A little over a year ago I upgraded the batteries to lithium since the originals had gone bad.  It was to the tune of a couple hundred but considered it money well spent.  I also have a 12V Hitachi set.  I would replace them if something ever happened to them.  I really like the freedom from a cord.  I can go anywhere around the house or yard and not have to carry a chord and worry where to plug it in.  Having a cordless circular saw, jig saw and reciprocating saw is a must too.   

 

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My makita drill/driver is the only cordless tool in the shop...unless were counting me and the flash lights.;)

Of course, there are the planes, hammers and screw divers. Not to mention chisles, saws and mallets.:D

Air tools don't count. Well, maybe there is a cordless 80 gallon compressor out there.:rolleyes:

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They all have their place. I consistently reach for my cordless tools. Working out of garage with only two 110V outlets available, I just don't like having to plug and unplug tools and equipment constantly. I, also, like the freedom of not having to constantly re-position, tripping over, and untangling cords and hoses when using several different tools.

 

For the professional I think that cordless tools are a must. How much time is saved stringing and stowing cords and hoses on a job? Time is money. For the hobbyist, it is pure convenience. All of my tools were corded when I started out. Over the years I slowly transitioned...first a cordless screw driver...what a joy when it came to electrical wall plates, then the cordless drill...quick hole...no cord stretched into the back yard/driveway...on and on...

 

Certain things I won't/don't normally use; battery powered circular saws, reciprocating saws, and a few others...they just don't seem to have the ooomph of a corded tool.

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8 minutes ago, schnewj said:

They all have their place. I consistently reach for my cordless tools. Working out of garage with only two 110V outlets available, I just don't like having to plug and unplug tools and equipment constantly. I, also, like the freedom of not having to constantly re-position, tripping over, and untangling cords and hoses when using several different tools.

 

For the professional I think that cordless tools are a must. How much time is saved stringing and stowing cords and hoses on a job? Time is money. For the hobbyist, it is pure convenience. All of my tools were corded when I started out. Over the years I slowly transitioned...first a cordless screw driver...what a joy when it came to electrical wall plates, then the cordless drill...quick hole...no cord stretched into the back yard/driveway...on and on...

 

Certain things I won't/don't normally use; battery powered circular saws, reciprocating saws, and a few others...they just don't seem to have the ooomph of a corded tool.

I'm 5'17'' tall/big/??.. my old cabinet builder FRIEND was a good  5 & half' tall, so was'ez helper. They always had cords strung all over the shop.  One day I arrived with little small/tiny cable,4 small cable clamps, SEVERAL BATHROOM CURTAIN ??HOOKS??, two screw in eye bolts, many little cable ties, male & female electrical plug in for 110 volts.went to futher in/side of shop. Screwed eye bolt in near wall receptacle, went to where they worked/moved around working, above their heads bout 5 -6' screwed in other eye bolt. Back to other side, clamped cable into eyebolt. Strung cable to OTHER EYEBOLT, pulled it tight, clamped it to it's self. Went back to other end, with his longest electrical cord & DONE THE DIRTY WORK. Put enuff cord to reach recepital and used couple llittle cable ties!! LET CORD SAG & BACK UP TO A bathroom curtain hooks,(already on cable) USED CABLE TIE to tighten the cord to hook. Let cord sag 5-6' bak up to hook. DID THIS ALL THE WAY UP/ACROSS/?? TO WHERE THEY WORKED. ASK'M HOW HIGH did they want PLUG IN ABOVE THEIR HEAD.

SUPPOSE YALL CAN FIGUER OUT REST, I'M TIRED.

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2 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

My makita drill/driver is the only cordless tool in the shop...unless were counting me and the flash lights.;)

Of course, there are the planes, hammers and screw divers. Not to mention chisles, saws and mallets.:D

Air tools don't count. Well, maybe there is a cordless 80 gallon compressor out there.:rolleyes:

Actually, there are battery powered compressors (and miter saws).    But the article was for DIYers, not pros on the construction site.

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For commerical they purchase the charging boom box and that is corded then charge the batteries up so that do not have cords lying around to trip over.  As others have said in a shop no big deal and only uncorded thing i have a drill / driver and go to it 90% of the time because of convience and a desire to keep my extension cords free of glue.  Weather you are a finish carptener or a hobyist some tools are better cordless even in the shop.

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I'm "DIY" fer shur.  I have all the Ryobi yard tools, plus trim router, jigsaw, drills, circular.  If I have a lot of repetitive steps (pocket holes) I'll use the corded drill, but for the rest the occasional short term use makes cordless much more convenient.  I note that Festool now has a cord converter for their cordless.  I'm sure others will follow.  me want

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Chorded all the way in my shop, just my screw gun is battery.

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We have a bunch of cordless/gasless  yard tools. Greatest things since sliced bread. Been thinking about a chainsaw. Not convinced, yet. Anyone have good experience with a good one?

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2 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

We have a bunch of cordless/gasless  yard tools. Greatest things since sliced bread. Been thinking about a chainsaw. Not convinced, yet. Anyone have good experience with a good one?

Yup! Stihl. Burns gas. No place in the woods to plug in a charger!

John

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8 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

We have a bunch of cordless/gasless  yard tools. Greatest things since sliced bread. Been thinking about a chainsaw. Not convinced, yet. Anyone have good experience with a good one?

Not a chain saw, but I'd almost married my Ryobi recip (battry) with a 12" arbor blade.  King of the forest.

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20 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

We have a bunch of cordless/gasless  yard tools. Greatest things since sliced bread. Been thinking about a chainsaw. Not convinced, yet. Anyone have good experience with a good one?

Yup! NOT impressed! Great power starting out...quick battery drains...and some durability issues from others I've talked to about them. Definitely not for serious yard work.

 

If I need small branches trimmed (2-3"), like PeteM, I reach for my cordless reciprocating saw with a good blade. Easier to handle and good for tight spaces where you can't get a good angle with a hand saw. Anything bigger and I reach for the gas saw (Poulan 18") which is always ready to go. Well, not true, it is on the bench right now. The bar oil pump started leaking after 25 YEARS of not so light use, so, I'm waiting on a new pump and pickup.

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On 10/11/2017 at 9:18 AM, kmealy said:

Do we really need all these cordless tools?

 

certainly...

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1 hour ago, schnewj said:

Yup! NOT impressed! Great power starting out...quick battery drains...and some durability issues from others I've talked to about them. Definitely not for serious yard work.

 

If I need small branches trimmed (2-3"), like PeteM, I reach for my cordless reciprocating saw with a good blade. Easier to handle and good for tight spaces where you can't get a good angle with a hand saw. Anything bigger and I reach for the gas saw (Poulan 18") which is always ready to go. Well, not true, it is on the bench right now. The bar oil pump started leaking after 25 YEARS of not so light use, so, I'm waiting on a new pump and pickup.

Yep, about what I figgered. 

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How else are the tool manufactures supposed to make a profit? Everyone ( who can afford one ) now has a CNC (or two), now to get DIY'ers to part with (yet) more money. :(

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