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I can't find my meager supply of non woven pads, not that I ever had that many. But I need some and I'd like to get the larger 6x9 size, I think the ones I had were much smaller 3M pads. Anyway, I started searching for them and was overwhelmed. I'd like a name brand (Norton , 3M, others?) and a box of 20 with 4 grits. Nada, except maybe Peachtree. I don't care much for Peachtree, looking at their display at the WW'ing show some years ago they struck me as the HF of the woodworking world (some good stuff with a lot of junk). So, what non woven pas do you prefer, and where do you get them? Right now I just need some for a little rust removal, but I intend to stock them in my shop (if it ever shows up).

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Fred,

 

Go with the 3M Scotchbrite brand. They are not cheap no matter where you buy them. A box of 6x9's will run around $20 but they will last you for a long time.

 

I generally cut them into whatever usable size that I need, and continually use them until they literally fall apart. I typically use the Maroon, Gray, Green (found at Sam's Club in the cleaning section) and White (between coats of Shellac) works great.

 

They work just as well as sandpaper on profiles without all of the dust. 

 

In case you don't have this:COLOR CODES NON-WOVEN PADS.pdf

 

 

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I'm OK with 3M pads, and those are the colors I want. Even the price is OK....the bigger problem is finding a source. I'll keep looking.

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I'm a 3M and Norton believer and this newer flexible 3M all pro flexible is perfect for the way I finish lacquer..The last package only had 4, 4" wide sheets costing a bunch and wife commented thats seems like too much money. So far the way I use it, that package might last years..........Its only used in between coats of lacquer.

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Amazon carries the maroon, grey and white pads. Bulk pkgs (20, I think) are around $17. That's way more than I need. I buy a few at a time when I'm in a woodworking store. Which is rare.

 

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Well, I had searched the 'zon, but I used the words "non woven pads" and didn't get the 3M ones. But when I used "Scotchbrite" they came up. Thanks!

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Just as a data point...I had a full box of Maroon when I came to FL. seven years ago. I have only used three or four full sheets. They get cut to smaller, more manageable, pieces and used and reused. Much more cost effective then wasting sandpaper.

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You might try here-  http://www.supergrit.com/products/products_automarine-scuff

 

These folks have a super selection of sanding products and the price is right. I get all my sanding supplies from them.

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Thanks Lew, I'll put together an order there, I can select the number and grit. I see they also have the wheels, I may pick up one of them.

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This will sound weird (my stock in trade) but I found that the dish scrubbies at the local grocery work pretty well.  You can effectively vary the "grit" rating by letting off the pressure.  I was using it to make a satin finish on gloss poly, it did well, so I tried it on other finishes.  I can't tell the diff.

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Wow!

 

Thanks, Lew. Some really good prices and the selection is outstanding.

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35 minutes ago, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

Thanks Lew, I'll put together an order there, I can select the number and grit. I see they also have the wheels, I may pick up one of them.

If you are ever in the Gettysburg PA area, you can walk in and get what you want. Really nice folks, there.

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I've always used the Scotch-Brite.   I've used the maroon (7447) and light gray (7448) (one grade finer) and dark gray (6448) (one grade coarser), and very rarely, white (7445).   Maroon and light gray for between coat scuffing and dulling.

ScotchBrite%20Chart.jpg

 

I normally buy a box at a local paint store but if I'm putting in an order for other stuff, from wwhardware.com.  I think you can also find them at shops catering to auto body repair / painting.

 

I usually cut them in half with a shop knife to use.

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Can we delve into this topic a bit?  As a newer individual to woodworking, I would love to know the background on what you use these for (IE am I doing it wrong and need to buy some ASAP).  What are you replacing, and what circumstances are you reaching for these pads?

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In this instance, I need some for removing rust from cast iron surfaces. With a little WD40, they really do a nice job. I'm between shops at the moment and keeping the rust off my tools is an ongoing battle (they are stored in the garage until my shop is ready). As it turns out, you can also get this in wheel form (for bench grinders, I've not tried them) and belts for a hand held belt sander. I have some belts and use them for the same thing, cleaning metal surfaces. Beyond that, I've pretty much replaced steel wool in my shop with these and fibral wool. Steel wool can leave behind shards of metal....particularly a problem with waterborne finishes if you use steel wool to smooth them out. The shards can rust, and leave specs behind. The pads do about the same job but with none of the steel shards. They last a good long while, but I suspect they are still more expensive...but well worth it in my opinion. I never used a lot of steel wool anyway, but the pieces I have left are confined to cleaning shores and such, they don't touch wood. Some of the others may have more clever uses that I haven't thought up.

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Joe,  use them as you would the finer grits of sandpaper. Both, on unfinished and between finish coats. 

They leave a smoother feel on the wood and really help knock down the gloss of some finishes.

They last ages longer than most sand papers.

And, as Fred noted, they're great on metal, as well.

Grab an assortment the next time you are in a place that sells them in onseies and twosies. Try them out. 

They're not as cheap as sanding sheets but, the won't break the bank, either.

Edited by Gene Howe

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Thanks.  So to make sure I get it, you still sand normally in the lower grits with paper, then shift to these pads in the higher grits for final sanding and smoothing out finishes?

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9 minutes ago, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

In this instance, I need some for removing rust from cast iron surfaces. With a little WD40, they really do a nice job. I'm between shops at the moment and keeping the rust off my tools is an ongoing battle (they are stored in the garage until my shop is ready). As it turns out, you can also get this in wheel form (for bench grinders, I've not tried them) and belts for a hand held belt sander. I have some belts and use them for the same thing, cleaning metal surfaces. Beyond that, I've pretty much replaced steel wool in my shop with these and fibral wool. Steel wool can leave behind shards of metal....particularly a problem with waterborne finishes if you use steel wool to smooth them out. The shards can rust, and leave specs behind. The pads do about the same job but with none of the steel shards. They last a good long while, but I suspect they are still more expensive...but well worth it in my opinion. I never used a lot of steel wool anyway, but the pieces I have left are confined to cleaning shores and such, they don't touch wood. Some of the others may have more clever uses that I haven't thought up.

 

Cleaning up rust is about the only thing I use WD-40 for anymore. WD and a Maroon pad does wonders. When I refurbish hand saws I soak the saw plate in WD, let it soak and then use a single blade razor scraper to get the bulk off. This may be repeated several times. Then I go to work with the WD and the pad. Does wonders at getting the plates back to a usable condition.

I, also, agree on your steel wool thoughts. I hardly ever use wool anymore. As for the cost, you are paying roughly $1 for a 6 x 9 sheet. I cut it into 1/4 sheet pieces or smaller. I use and reuse them over and over. I just don't mix chores for the pieces. In the long run I feel that they are not only more cost effective, but cleaner to use and longer lived.

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6 minutes ago, Joe Candrilli said:

Thanks.  So to make sure I get it, you still sand normally in the lower grits with paper, then shift to these pads in the higher grits for final sanding and smoothing out finishes?

Joe,

 

Look at the PDF I posted it will tell you everything you need. Keith posted a portion of the PDF above. Use the pads just like you would sandpaper. They are not a total replacement for quality paper, but will do a very good job with a lot less mess and in my opinion are more cost effective then sandpaper in some cases.

 

They are just another way to "Skin the Cat". I find that they don't "cut" like sandpaper does, but they do leave a comparable surface finish. You may not want to sand a surface for fear of cutting a finish,  blowing through a veneer or changing dimensions, yet you need a certain finish level. This is where the pads really work.

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For me, they did not replace sandpaper...only steel wool. But they will replace the finer grits (do they same job)  of paper if you want to do so. One use I have i forgot to mention, they excel at softening the glare of gloss finishes (knock down the sheen).

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