Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
John Morris

MWTCA June 2017 "What's It" Project

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Thanks John for the follow-up explanation.

Me too...helps to better understand MWTCA criteria for validation.

 

yup...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

   Thank you all, sometimes its is good to be lucky.

 

   thEKT1QGEO.jpg.259b62774748371ef9f605ff73ced5f2.jpg

 

  Hope to see you all at the family reunion.

 

 

Edited by DuckSoup (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, John Morris said:

CS Unitec's Non-sparking, Non-magnetic Hand Tools

 

In respect to your reference to CS Unitec's tools, I don't think this relevant, these are modern tools made from modern materials and I don't think they were available for the time period that the Dissten saw was manufactured. When I was young the  non- sparking tools were heavy copper plated steel.

Herb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Dadio said:

 

In respect to your reference to CS Unitec's tools, I don't think this relevant, these are modern tools made from modern materials and I don't think they were available for the time period that the Dissten saw was manufactured. When I was young the  non- sparking tools were heavy copper plated steel.

Herb

It's only relevant to back up the suggestion that the hand saw was copper plated to resist sparking, the website at that reference shows a copper hand saw used in any industry where flammable liquids or gasses are present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/2/2017 at 9:27 PM, Dadio said:

Handsaws would not be apt to produce sparks when cutting even if they hit a nail.

Hey Herb, just had a thought, even though it is highly unlikely a hand saw could spark upon cutting, keep in mind, I bet they were not only thinking of while cutting, but how about when dropped, or another tool is dropped on the hand saw, or the hand saw is sent skidding down a walkway from some freak accident, sparks could be created.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Morris said:

Hey Herb, just had a thought, even though it is highly unlikely a hand saw could spark upon cutting, keep in mind, I bet they were not only thinking of while cutting, but how about when dropped, or another tool is dropped on the hand saw, or the hand saw is sent skidding down a walkway from some freak accident, sparks could be created.

You are right John with a regular saw, but a copper plated steel saw with sharpened teeth would not be effected in that manner. Remember in those days they were very lax in their safety standards as compared to today where they make it safe enough for a little old lady to walk in off the street and do the job.

That was when men were men, they walked the beams with not harness, rode the ball up on the crane or rode the load up.. They hung from a single lanyard off a piling to run a jack hammer. they walked a single plank with no guardrails, and on and on.

Herb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Dadio said:

You are right John with a regular saw, but a copper plated steel saw with sharpened teeth would not be effected in that manner.

That was my point Herb. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Dadio said:

That was when men were men, they walked the beams with not harness, rode the ball up on the crane or rode the load up.. They hung from a single lanyard off a piling to run a jack hammer. they walked a single plank with no guardrails, and on and on.

Being in the construction industry as I am, I am thankful for OSHA, and the required safety standards in place, more men, and women, are able to come home to their families, alive, and in one piece today. Thank GOD for safety standards. But ya, I get yer point Herb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dadio said:

I partially agree with you ,but don't get me started on that subject. That is one of the main reasons I retired from being a Const. Supt. for over 25 yrs and a foreman for 12 years before that. Too many little old ladies working out there that shouldn't be because of the safety regulations allowing  and the first time they hurt their little pinkies they want disability, they wont work high, they wont work below ground and they want the easiest job on the project,virtually doing nothing but standing to the side making wisecracks at the good workers.

Herb

Yep, then there's them types. Fortunately they don't last long anymore Herb. Here in California we have an employment at will labor law, it protects companies from folks just like that. They can be fired on the spot with no recourse. And they are. California is one jacked up state, but we got that one right.

I don't see the folks you describe anywhere I've worked, we have a bunch of hard chargers. But then I'm building bridges and roads, bridge builders are a different mindset, iron workers, carpenters, not much room for slackers, they are found out quickly and ejected on the spot. 

Sorry your experience was different, that's sad!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dadio said:

virtually doing nothing but standing to the side making wisecracks at the good workers.

Hey Herb, why weren't they fired? Curiosity is killing me on this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Morris said:

Hey Herb, why weren't they fired? Curiosity is killing me on this one.

There were several reasons, we had to maintain quotas, (women and minorities), only could let them go with a general reduction in force,RIF, the company didn't like to pay higher unemployment premiums , if we had a RIF we couldn't rehire others had to rehire the ones we let go first.

Outright firing was only if they did something unsafe, or a flagrant violation of company policys, etc.

Herb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Dadio said:

There were several reasons, we had to maintain quotas, (women and minorities), only could let them go with a general reduction in force,RIF, the company didn't like to pay higher unemployment premiums , if we had a RIF we couldn't rehire others had to rehire the ones we let go first.

Outright firing was only if they did something unsafe, or a flagrant violation of company policys, etc.

Herb

That sucks Herb, really, that must of been very frustrating for you. You have my sympathies. Hey, retirement is better anyway right!:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohio is an at will employment state too.  It can and is written differently into union contracts and both parties are held to those contracts.  Probably same and cause of Herb's experiences.

Here is an excerpt from Ohio's law.

 

 

C. Employment Contract

An employer and employee may agree to an employment agreement to override the "at-will" relationship. For example, if an employer hires someone under an employment contract, which specifies the duration and terms of employment, then both parties are held to such terms. Termination by the employer or resignation by the employee prior to the agreed term may constitute a breach of the contract, thereby exposing the breaching party to liability for damages. In addition, a contract may include negotiated reasons for termination or resignation, in which case the parties must abide by these limitations or face liability for breaching the contract.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


About us

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our veterans and active duty both here in the United States and in Canada, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. So please, join us! Please click on Join The Patriot Woodworker's.

 

We support MWTCA, preserving tools and implements from the past.

M-WTCA Logo.gif

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

Visit us on Facebook

×