Smallpatch

Got the outside cut out today

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Cutting a full 1" maple and 3/8' Baltic Birch at the same time is hard to hold that much weight and get the blade to follow the line in a good smooth motion.... Every time I would look up at the blade it was leaning one way or the other plus the blade burns the wood when it gets in a bind like that....

 I will now remove the 3/8" backer board to cut the carvings away from the interior. Then the easy part begins....... oh sure.IMG_8740.JPG.60897a550d8e82ea37b7730a9a1ba115.JPGIMG_8743.JPG.4db8c94581a2665cc9fd4764e1c6f4ab.JPG

 

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Hey Lew, if it wasn't for your reply there would be no reason  for me to post pictures, so I'm not wasting my time. ThanksIMG_8755.JPG.de233857c3a3fa1752882391234fd661.JPG

After removing the backer board which I will use to attach these pieces back on the mother board so to speak I cut the carving pieces away fro the mother board. The easy part now begins. The next step is I sit in a chair, turn the Dremel on and let it do its thing. Almost like running a CNC machine. I drew lines where I should be grinding . The coarse bits cuts faster but have a mind of their own and cause fox holes where they should not be. 

   With the maple being 1" thick, I have lots of depth to make them look , my opinion, look better than the store bought stuff I use kinda as a pattern...IMG_8757.JPG.6d6e46a908ec230723e5c6935ddafb99.JPG   

This picture I have the back board back on . 

IMG_8751.JPG.a0021335c3f8576bd6a1b035f4ac022c.JPG

 

Also if I cut the pieces out with the right blade the edges will need no attention for they are actually smoother than they need to be..

  I'm now off to tune up my cnc dremel.

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5 hours ago, Smallpatch said:

Also if I cut the pieces out with the right blade the edges will need no attention for they are actually smoother than they need to be..

So these edges you're showing are just cut with no sanding of any kind to this point? Simply amazing...leads me to LOTS of questions then Patch...Thanks in advance...

--- What blades are you using to achieve this? TPI? Brand? Set? etc.? Or is the a Texas Patch closely guarded secret?:P

--- What is the SPM setting on your saw? Is it fixed or VS adjustable?

--- How often do/ did you have to change blades to maintain this level of cut?

--- Untrained minds want to know?

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Posted (edited)

This is what I carved today and this is the bits I use. 
IMG_8763.JPG.8c16ac89c470d3f08c391818ae965c5b.JPG

IMG_8766.JPG.2a04840b9057135192fde32ed1f101b4.JPG

Actually the two on the right is the only ones I have used today.. The one in the middle is about the best for ruffing in and the other smooths some... then the sand paper thingy. These are 1/8" bits. I do have 1/4" bits but they dig too many fox holes where they are not wanted...

  When the knobby one get filled with junk drop it in a bottle of lacquer thinner for a while then use a very fine wire brush to get it back to new again. Its about 2 years old and looks like it did the day I bought it...

   This carving stuff is really the easiest part of woodworking I have been involved in...sitting in a chair holding a dremel with a flexable shaft. Can't get any easier than that...

  Dave I just read you post after I posted this so I will add a little.

www.woodcarverssupply.com  page 18 of their catalog

265050

265051

265081

265091

 

629421

629422

629425

629427

These are on page 10

 I also have some of the fast cut mini monsters which is right next to the original fine cut numbers I just typed but they will dig fox holes where they are un wanted..  

I do have some bit of the 1/4" models but they are too wild  for what I have been doing.

  I like the Dremel with a flex shaft better than the bigger Foredom with the 1/4" bits because it is too heavy and clumsey..

  Dave these wood pieces I started on today is still in the ruffout stage. When I get the rest on the right side ruffed in I will keep going over all of them till I get through.... One can stop on these things when ever for it I think up to to builder. I am taking more wood off then when I first started learning last year. I'm still in the learning stages so still playing...

   I do have some diamond coated 1/8" bits to smooth the wood with, but this depends on the user as to how good he can hold and steady the bits and maybe he can stop there but I think I still need lots of sand paper to make the wood like I want to see it..

  I have got to where I can make good enough carvings with the french curve set then print out some patterns, make some out of wood for future tracing around which is some I used on this clock frame. Hobby Lobby, Michaels and a few places on line. 

   If interested let me know and I will look up the places I order Appliques from .

  Dave, just the two bits is all I have used so far on the six different pieces.I don't have any hand held carving knives. Too old for that crap...

Yesterday and today the scroll saw was set about medium speed on the Dewalt. I hardly ever change speeds unless I am using the really fine metal cutting blades and the not much tension or else you will pull the blade in two.

Yesterday I used a #5 Flying Dutchman blade to cut the outside  then today I use a #5 Olson precision cut blade to cut the carvings off of the clock body...This blade is really aggressive and a person has to really learn to control it. Its actually better for mostly straight cutting.

  I used one blade today  and yesterday I use 3 blades while moving about 10 lbs or more swinging around is really hard on the blades and for sure and old art. 

   No secrets here. Hey I want every one to start carving like I do... Its not hard at all.. Just learn the steps to go through..ask me anything.

 Like I told steamshovel I did not buy any full sets of bits only the four in two different sets are all I use. Dremel bits are junk and you will waste your money on their bits, I did.

   The flex shaft on the Dremel take a little wheel bearing grease and coat the cable and it will last many years.

 Hard to say how long a blade will last on the scroll saw.

Sawing 1'4"plywood a long time.This project I got going now the maple is a hair over 1" thick plus the

baltic birch is 3/8" thick. Kinda hard on the blades. I just saw till I start smelling wood burning. Cutting knotty pine or yellow pine, a dull blade will wander more than a sharp blade... 

   Dave I keep running down spiral blades.. Because a person needs the practice of following a small line, the smaller the line the more accurate a person will get. Yes I have guys tell me, thats all they use is spirals then when they try to use a regular blade they get pissed... I ordered a pack of 12 spirals when they first came out. This was years ago. I still have 11 of those blades somewhere. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Smallpatch (see edit history)
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Pretty productive day I'd say Patch.

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7 hours ago, Smallpatch said:

cut the pieces out with the right blade the edges will need no attention for they are actually smoother than they need to be

I thought those edges were sanded and polished! I think I need some serious scroll saw training!

 

1 hour ago, Smallpatch said:

his carving stuff is really the easiest part

When I looked at some of the previous images of your clocks, I was amazed at the "carving". I thought it was done with gouges and other similar tools. Really neat using the dremel like that. Sure must speed things up!

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1 hour ago, lew said:

I thought those edges were sanded and polished! I think I need some serious scroll saw training!

 

When I looked at some of the previous images of your clocks, I was amazed at the "carving". I thought it was done with gouges and other similar tools. Really neat using the dremel like that. Sure must speed things up!

You and me both Lew...I don't think I get that nice of a finish using my OSS.

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2 hours ago, Smallpatch said:

Dave I just read you post after I posted this so I will add a little.

www.woodcarverssupply.com  page 18 of their catalog

Thanks, I'll take a look at those Patch...I've done very little scroll work and likely the blades might be part of my problem. I don't have top of the line scroll saws either, but was what the budget allowed at the time; (2) Craftsman 16". one is VS; other is a Rigid (very similar to a Grizzly model) now discontinued...all were used, but very little...don't recall exactly, but I have less than $75 in all 3. That might also be part of the issue; patience or actually lack there of likely comes into play too..Keep the pictures coming of this project...I'm watching, learning and admiring.

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Finished the rough in more or less. I'll now spend a few days smoothing the wood then using a belt sander to slope the body down hill to make it look like I've raised the carving.

IMG_8773.JPG.2445dd7da316fb75d2202bc9772ac2ea.JPG

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Lew it really amazed me how simple the first one of these clocks with the fancy stuff around the outside turned out to be.. Too bad I didn't figure this out when I was in the thirties and with no health problems.

  The first part of doing this one I'm working on taking ruff wood and getting it ready to glue up is a bitch....Living in the country I set my planer up in the driveway and a ton of shavings filter in around and on my yard.. nothing wrong with that. Then running the wood through the joiner. No big deal there. Using my table saw as a work table I edge glue three boards with biscuits every three inches for protection. No I've never had any boards come apart but the way I go about it might be the reason. Next I use the 22-44 drum sander to make sure the board will sit flat on the scroll saw while cutting things out.Then after two or three days time I am ready to attach a pattern on to the prepared board..Then I finally get to relax while making the carvings look like they should..

  So many guys have commented too hard for me to do THAT. 90 % of THAT is just regular wood working.!

  Some say they don't have the patients or can't concentrate that long....Well no if a guy has to order simple things like push sticks, simple jigs and the really easy things to build rather than order or by then having a wood working hobby is the wrong thing to pass the time. A person can't operate a scroll saw with as little learning as with a table saw. A person can't go in to a big box store and ask where the scroll saw blades are located,buy a few and go home and make things using that scroll saw. First off the big box store does not sell the right blades to start with..

    Practice, practice, practice is the only way  and I don't mind saying it again, using spiral blades does not teach a person anything about operating the saw with a regular blade. Nothing, well, except where the switch is.

   Nope, about trade secrets. None at all. I'm here to help.

  

 

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18 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

Lew it really amazed me how simple the first one of these clocks with the fancy stuff around the outside turned out to be.. Too bad I didn't figure this out when I was in the thirties and with no health problems.

  The first part of doing this one I'm working on taking ruff wood and getting it ready to glue up is a bitch....Living in the country I set my planer up in the driveway and a ton of shavings filter in around and on my yard.. nothing wrong with that. Then running the wood through the joiner. No big deal there. Using my table saw as a work table I edge glue three boards with biscuits every three inches for protection. No I've never had any boards come apart but the way I go about it might be the reason. Next I use the 22-44 drum sander to make sure the board will sit flat on the scroll saw while cutting things out.Then after two or three days time I am ready to attach a pattern on to the prepared board..Then I finally get to relax while making the carvings look like they should..

  So many guys have commented too hard for me to do THAT. 90 % of THAT is just regular wood working.!

  Some say they don't have the patients or can't concentrate that long....Well no if a guy has to order simple things like push sticks, simple jigs and the really easy things to build rather than order or by then having a wood working hobby is the wrong thing to pass the time. A person can't operate a scroll saw with as little learning as with a table saw. A person can't go in to a big box store and ask where the scroll saw blades are located,buy a few and go home and make things using that scroll saw. First off the big box store does not sell the right blades to start with..

    Practice, practice, practice is the only way  and I don't mind saying it again, using spiral blades does not teach a person anything about operating the saw with a regular blade. Nothing, well, except where the switch is.

   Nope, about trade secrets. None at all. I'm here to help.

  

 

You just described me.

Herb

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51 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

Nope, about trade secrets. None at all. I'm here to help.

Thanks for the explanation! I only use my scroll occasionally and admittedly not nearly enough to get good at making cuts. I really like the idea of using the dremel to create "carvings". I must give that a try. I could see that process as a way of adding embellishments to a turning. 

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Herb what could we do to get you headed down the right road. I mean no harm.

I just want other guys doing this also.

   I met a guy long ago who begged me to help him learn woodworking. I finally said with one arm missing I think you would be a danger to yourself around all the machinery..

I do hope you are not equipped the same...From your photo you look much brighter than I so if its money that has you tied down I could name a few guys here..

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And look at the bright side Herb after you start making carvings on the outside of clocks similar to what I am making you could sell many for lots of money thus helping out on that last sentence as in my last post...

 

   

You really can't start figuring your income quite yet cause so far I haven't sold a single carved clock.  So no we can't put a value on something without a track record....

 

I told wifeeee the things I have made thats hanging all over the walls I am sure the value will increase after I die....Now she is urging me to make things happen soon... She said, I do need do need money .

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Lew I don't know if I mentioned earlier but the Dremel along with the flexible shaft is great but most of their bits are high speed steel and not carbide and will not last but a few days...

   Also those 1/4" bit Wood Carvers have are great on large bears and tote-em poles but are way too agressive on stuff that I do. The kutzall are great to start the shapes but they leave furrows like in plowing with a tractor. Same goes for the Nuggets. I use only the 1/8" shaft sizes but you still need something to smooth the wood later. The stone, diamond and ruby bits will burn really bad. So if you use them you will need something to remove the the burnt wood....

  I can't see any use for the cloth backed sleeves in what I do but I use the oscillating spindle sander instead of those.  

    I do believe if a person shells out  264.95 for the Mastercarver flex shaft system shown on page 4 of their catalog especially with the bit set that comes with the set the person that buys the set will never continue learning to carve.....for that matter the same goes for the set on the opposite page.   The hand piece is too big to grip and control and the bits will do nothing but burn....I bought the Foredom years ago and it only uses 1/4" bits. For what I do its useless.....

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7 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

I bought the Foredom years ago and it only uses 1/4" bits. For what I do its useless.....

I used to work with a friend in a "casting" business. He had the Foredom dremel for working with metal jewelry. I never used it. It seemed kind of bulky to me.

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