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John Morris

MWTCA March 2017 "What's It" Project

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7 minutes ago, HandyDan said:

 

The three sets of numbers are all on the same piece.

Well, that oughta make it easier for Dave, then. B)

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Just now, Dadio said:

I'm The dummy, what was I thinking? DUH.

Herb

No let me be the dummy Herb...pretty sure that's what they pay me for here.:wacko:

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10 hours ago, Grandpadave52 said:

No let me be the dummy Herb...pretty sure that's what they pay me for here.:wacko:

check...

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Dave, Herb, get in line. If they paid dummies here, I'd be rich.:unsure:

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10 minutes ago, Dadio said:

Really? We used willow sticks.

Herb

Peach sticks (forks) here...

Edited by Grandpadave52 (see edit history)

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I could use a couple "L" shaped rebars, walk along and find where any unknown pipes, and wires were. 

 

Ok, Now IF you laid this thing down on the engine, say with the row of 1s up,   and moved the crankshaft until the #1 piston is top dead center, this should show where the other pistons should be at.   Might be able to quickly set the "points" that way.

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1 hour ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Peach sticks (forks) here...

Cherry. Never fails.

John

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1 hour ago, steven newman said:

I could use a couple "L" shaped rebars, walk along and find where any unknown pipes, and wires were.

Learned to use a couple of unfolded, then bent "L" shaped coat hangers too...learned that from an "old guy" who worked 40+ years for Indiana Gas & Water Co. That was 50+ years ago...what most of the meter readers used back then to find both gas & water lines buried from street to the houses/meters...

 

I was "taught" the "watering witching" with a peach branch from a couple of really old guys over 50 years ago who used it when wells were still being hand dug...Probably couldn't do it anymore...Have used the coat hanger trick many times to find buried copper lines from LP tanks and also "chasing" filed drain tile..probably couldn't grip right anymore doing that either...

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Some used the willow forked branch and held on to the fork, others used 2 willow sticks,one in each hand crossed in the middle.

Why willow? Well I was told by some one of extreme authority ,because willows always seek water. Couldn't argue with my Dad.

I have done the bent rebar and the coat hanger one for pipes.

 

Herb

Edited by Dadio (see edit history)

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Since no verified answer has been given to this What's It, a random drawing will be held today and a winner chosen! Stay tuned, and we'll also get the new What's It up and live as well, thank you for participating!

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The folks at MWTCA have reviewed the suggestion here, and they are not quite satisfied yet! So, we went to a random draw to determine March's recipient of a one calendar year membership to the MWTCA and all it's benefits. I am proud to say that the hand tool gods were looking down on @steven newman with a big smile, congratulations Steve, courtesy of The Patriot Woodworker community, you are the March winner! What a very appropriate award to go to a very appropriate recipient, Steven Newman is the quintessential Neanderthal Woodworker here in our community.

Steve, please shoot me a PM with the following information:

 

  • Address where you would like the membership and magazines sent.
  • Your phone number
  • Your wife's name
  • Your email you can be reached at

All the above information is required by MWTCA.

 

Than you all for participating in the March project. 

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4 minutes ago, John Morris said:

What a very appropriate award to go to a very appropriate recipient, Steven Newman is the quintessential Neanderthal Woodworker here in our community.

+1!!! How cool is this!! Some things just work out the way they should!!

Congrats @steven newman...Could not have gone to a more deserving individual!!

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14 hours ago, John Morris said:

Steven Newman is the quintessential Neanderthal Woodworker here in our community.

Congratulations, Steven! Sometimes things just work out RIGHT! :D

John

FWIW, Neanderthals are considered troglodytes, which is particularly appropriate, considering Steven works in a cave!

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23 minutes ago, HARO50 said:

FWIW, Neanderthals are considered troglodytes, which is particularly appropriate, considering Steven works in a cave!

So true! Great observation!

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