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John Morris

MWTCA February 2017 "What's It" Project

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Ok ladies and gentlemen, we now have our February "What's it" live and ready!

 

The image(s) below is a MWTCA "What's It" image for you to research, and tell us all here in this topic post, just what the heck is it!

Remember, the first accurate answer wins a one year membership to the awesome organization MWTCA!

 

NEW: If an accurate answer cannot be arrived at by the end of the current calendar month this project is posted, a random drawing will be held to include anyone who participated in this months What's It. One winner will be chosen to receive a calendar year membership to MWTCA and all of it's wonderful benefits of membership. Compliments of The Patriot Woodworker Community.

 

For a run down on this project and the rules, please see this page at "The Patriot Woodworker and MWTCA "What's It" project"

 

Description

12" long, the heel is connected to the threaded rod and can move the ruler as it's rolled, or the ruler can be locked to stop the wheel at a predetermined distance.

166-4.JPG166-4b.JPG166-4c web only.JPG

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depth stop/gauge...

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hold down ... iffy...

fast w/ micro tuning adjustable stop block...

the ball end keeps saw dust from building up...

Edited by Stick486 (see edit history)

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I am thinking it might have something to do with a steam engine

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That does make sense. I would like to see what the slot looks like where you put the item to be cut, but I would say it was for tubing of some sort

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I think we have a winner! ...as Forrest Gump would say, "...and that's all I've got to say about that...":P

Edit add: OK I told a fib...I do have a little more to say...looking at Chuck's 2nd picture, maybe the mystery tool was for cutting dowels to length or maybe tenons given the saw slot.

Anyways, w/o Chuck's input I would never have speculated...still think he's the closest...

 

BTW @ChuckJ, Welcome to TPW from that "other place"...wouldn't have put 2 & 2 together without the jewelry reference...Glad to have ya' aboard...great place here!

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Thanks for all who welcomed me into the club and thanks to Grandpa Dave for inviting me over here in the first place from another forum. The reason I speculated this was used for dowels or square pegs instead of tubing is because it is made out of wood. I would think something used to cut metal would be made out of metal. This is not necessarily true though. I just wonder if this was a general use tool or made for something specific like cutting pegs to length to lock mortise and tenons together? 

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It could easily be a depth gauge.  The ruler should be turned around to make it right for that.  I think the ruler should go the other way no matter what since the knob thickness is not subtracted from it.

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Chuck has to be pretty close on this one. Measuring is definitely in the equation, but not all that accurately as the rule is only in 1/8" increments. It appears that it would be held in a vise of sorts for use. It would have to be for measuring/cutting/marking something of fine and/or soft material? And the material would have to be somewhat rigid in its length...nothing like a necklace chain. The cutting "slot" does not appear to be worn to any degree, nor are there any indications that the cutting implement "over-cut" and hence deepened the cutting "slot"...if cutting was the aim of the tool.  Possibly it was used for marking? I can only think of glass tubing, soft copper, or maybe just a good way to chop off the end of a good cigar??

Gary

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OR instead of a saw insert a knife and repeatably mark you parts to the same length.

Because if you used a saw you would need to subtract the slot width / 2 from the ruler length.

With a knife you place a cut (if the blade thickness matches the slot) exactly in the middle of the slot which is lined up to the rule.

Then you lock it in place and repeat.

 

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Some good points made. Due to the fact that it is made of wood instead of metal and there is no sign of wear in the slot, I could definitely see it being used only for marking to length instead of cutting to length in the tool. Miter boxes are made of wood, but if they are used they show wear in the slots. If this one is supposed to be used for cutting, it was probably never used or used very little.

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1 hour ago, ChuckJ said:

If this one is supposed to be used for cutting, it was probably never used or used very little.

a knife could have been the cutter on soft material...

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