Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
John Morris

MWTCA January 2017 "What's It" Project

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

gone now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" The history of FORUM B + V Oil Tools has begun for over 45 years with the simple idea of forging Elevator Links at its own blacksmith shop. Manufacturing of Pipe Handling Tools started to be a lucrative business for the shipyard so that FORUM B+V Oil Tools enlarged its product range step by step over the years."

 

B + B = Blohm + Voss.  

 

Looks like a tool for breaking links...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going along Sticks idea..  May be for adjusting tie rods or something similar.    Electrical crimpers (indenters)  have a rounded off edge to prevent cutting of the connector.   Roly

 Voss was a grain and implement dealer in Downs Kansas.   Don't know but have a feeling it was to adjust something on a farm implement.

Edited by Roly (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have  a clue, but would have guessed something along the line as @Roly...

 

That said, this likely be a challenging search as the same tool has been involved in a similar search for at least the last 3-1/2 years...:(

http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013_06_01_archive.html

 

Edit add: need to scroll down to third picture sets

Edited by Grandpadave52 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Grandpadave52 said:

this likely be a challenging search

Not for you guys Dave! We are The Patriot Woodworker's, aint gonna take us no 3.5 years to solve this!:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DuckSoup said:

  I'm leaning towards Stick & Roly, seems like it would be use to shorten or offset a throttle rod.

I am not a mechanic, is there anyway you guys could post something similar in a diagram to show what you are talking about?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the main/first picture, it is sitting upside down.   You would push down on the handle to disengage the  tooth like part from a detent.   The "U" bolt fits into a slot on the control arm.   You slide the "handle" onto the valve needing adjusting, make the adjustments, and then move onto the next valve.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Morris said:

I am not a mechanic, is there anyway you guys could post something similar in a diagram to show what you are talking about?

can't find a picture old enough for that style...

Steve describes it pretty well...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is an electric fence ferrule crimping tool.  The tool opened and closed to facilitate putting it over and getting it off the wire.  Can't find proof but here are the ferrules and the heavy tool they use today.

 

s-l1000.jpg

 

DP-3-4.JPG

 

20221.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All - I believe this tool is used to crimp the posts on chain links.   For example, if a piece of machinery had to have a chain removed for maintenance, the replacement chain would be installed and then require the posts on the "connector' link to be crimped so the link became a permanent part of the chain.  The jaws on this device open up so as to allow the chain to be enclosed in the jaws and the nuts tighten down on the chain to make the crimp.   Doing this does not take a great deal of leverage, hence the short handle. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Stick486 said:

can't find a picture old enough for that style...

Steve describes it pretty well...

Steve's description makes absolutely no sense to this non mechanical guy. I was hoping for something even in modern era to demonstrate what a tool like this does? A tool like it, used in today, for the purpose described.

I don't even know what a throttle rod is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image result for drag link sleeveThis sleeve is threaded inside with a left hand thread on one side and a right hand thread on the other end.  Works like a turn buckle to shorten or lengthen a rod. The tooth on the tool engages the slot which opens it up and turns it.

  Roly 

Edited by Roly (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Handle on a Steam Engine's Air brake/engine brake valves.   The pictures I just looked up show it enclosed under a top cover.

 

Dad used to work as a Fireman on the D T & I steam locomotives, shoveled coal from Flat Rock, MI down to Ironton, Oh, and back.    More or less lost his job when the railroad went all diesel in the mid 1950s....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Roly said:

Image result for drag link sleeveThis sleeve is threaded inside with a left hand thread on one side and a right hand thread on the other end.  Works like a turn buckle to shorten or lengthen a rod. The tooth on the tool engages the slot which opens it up and turns it.

  Roly 

Thanks Roly, and the "What's it" would have the same use as this tool pictured above?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, John Morris said:

Thanks Roly, and the "What's it" would have the same use as this tool pictured above?

 

8 minutes ago, John Morris said:

I'm not going to say that is what the tool is for, for sure.   Just a guess.    With the slot on one side and the spring it is made to place on and off something easily.   Not to be placed on and left on.   Roly

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found a couple levers..

Cass5A.JPG

Some of the later ones were covered with a sheet metal guard.   The notches on the valve to the left, fit the pointy thing on the "What is it" lever.  Depending on who made the valve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


About us

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our veterans and active duty both here in the United States and in Canada, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. So please, join us! Please click on Join The Patriot Woodworker's.

 

We support MWTCA, preserving tools and implements from the past.

M-WTCA Logo.gif

Get in touch

Follow us

Recent tweets

Visit us on Facebook

×