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John Morris

MWTCA November 2016 "What's It" Contest

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Ok ladies and gentlemen, we now have our November what's it live and ready!

 

So far we are 0 for 5! We just can't figure out what these wonderful examples of tools are!

 

The image(s) below is the current MWTCA "What's It" image for you to research, and tell us all here in this topic post, just what the heck is it!

Remember, the first accurate answer wins a one year membership to the awesome organization MWTCA!

For a run down on this project and the rules, please see this page at "The Patriot Woodworker and MWTCA "What's It" project"

 

160-16a.jpg

 

160-16.jpg

So without further Adieu, "What's It!" Submit your answers (and fun commentary) in the reply box. And win a one year membership for MWTCA for your correct answer!

Keep in mind, the MWTCA does not know what this item is either, the image was submitted by one of its members for us to research. Lets help MWTCA find an answer.

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As morbid as this might seem, my guess is a 19th Century, possibly early 20th Century embalming table; probably was on casters at one time. Most were portable as services usually occurred in the home of the deceased but there were dedicated funeral parlors as well....Just guessing, but I haven't felt all that well today so I could be way off base too. Like an auction, somebody has to start the first bid.

 

Image result for antique embalming table

Image result for antique embalming table

Image result for antique embalming table

Image result for antique embalming table

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It looks to me that you put a large fish on it, bring the lid down on it to hold it down, you sit where the lid was, put your feet on the shelves at the bottom and start the process of cleaning/filleting. It has wheels on it so it can be taken to a hose and clean up. The construction with the various parts, all say home made (or salvaged) and sized to go to the area where it was to be used..............my guess 

Edited by Ron Altier (see edit history)

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My first thought was some kind of food processing table. It looks like it slopes towards the door. Like maybe there was a tub under the door and the food being cut up was tossed into it and the door was to keep the fly's out while it was waiting to be removed.

Herb

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after looking at more examples...  I believe Gramps is on to something...

 

 

 

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I bet if Dave were to dig a bit deeper, and email a collector of embalming tables with this image, we could wrap this up and have a winner.;)

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Threshing table - the wheat shaft goes down the door to the floor the incline of the table feed the wheat to were the foot rest is.  The gleaner picks up the wheat shaft separates the wheat into a bucket near by then the left over chaff is discarded down the door.  The door when closed is how the wheat gets to the table in the form of a bale.  The bale is moved past the door then the drudgery starts.

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1 minute ago, Michael Thuman said:

Threshing table - the wheat shaft goes down the door to the floor the incline of the table feed the wheat to were the foot rest is.  The gleaner picks up the wheat shaft separates the wheat into a bucket near by then the left over chaff is discarded down the door.  The door when closed is how the wheat gets to the table in the form of a bale.  The bale is moved past the door then the drudgery starts.

This is awesome Michael, any backing evidence of this? Great job!

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Keep in mind folks, look at the ornate legs, this was a piece used for something serious, the threshing table suggestion submitted by Michael excited me, but then I remembered the ornate legs, suggesting it was an interior piece, perhaps as Dave suggested more like an embalming table?

Michael, don't abandon your thresher table suggestion, lets research this guys!

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No just my thoughts and experience from a farm but it could also be a hog slaughter table the curb holds in the blood. The the door is opened to allow the blood to drain out.

 

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Looks like a version of a shaving horse to me.  Maybe from a chair makers shop or wheel maker shaping spokes or rungs.  Tools (draw knive, spoke shave, etc) would store in the compartment under the hinged lid.  The user would then sit on the hinged lid (hopefully with a cushion) and his feet would go on the runners down each side to stabilize the horse. 

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I am thinking embalming table too, but what has me is the little steps along the side, unless the embalmer was a midget.

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I am thinking it was upholstered and used in a funeral home to lay the deceased on for viewing before the caskets became so ornate.  The bottom rungs were upholstered too to be used to kneel on to say a prayer.

 

  11081174_1616397278574559_2331469979987755014_n.jpg?oh=4826387b755a1f4bb86b36626d69e5ae&oe=58955E83

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The ornate pieces were most likely salvage. It does not have the appearance of a finely crafted piece. More likely home made and not taken care of 

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I'm with Dave on this one... either an embalming or an autopsy table.

John

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