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Found 32 results

  1. Elm

    Morning gents. Went to a home show here in KC last Friday. There was an Amish furniture booth there that had a dining table on display. The wood was amazing. Gorgeous color and grain pattern with wonderful contrast between the light and dark pattern in the wood. I had to ask what type of wood it was made of and was told elm. Anyone ever work with elm and if so what does it compare to re. workability? Thanks.
  2. I get Tom Fidgen's Newsletter in my inbox and I always look forward to it. Tom is a hand made by hand tool guy, long story short, great stuff, beautiful work, I have been following him for along time. In the most recent newsletter he is advertising his new Two Handled Rasps, these are beautiful tools, I want them, I gotta have them, don't know how yet, but some day I'll have them in my shop. These tools just make sense, with their two handles, stitched rasp, these are made for accurate stock removal. I have no horse in the game here, I just love beautiful tools is all. Here they are. Just thought I'd share them.
  3. Works in Wood 2017

    until
    Works in Wood 2017 The 18th year for New Hope Arts banner exhibition! Works in Wood honors the rich cultural heritage of Bucks County woodworking while celebrating the new visions of the contemporary artists who reside in our region and beyond. As a national juried show, Works in Wood features artwork from the finest talent in the country today. Works are not limited by function but must be original in design and artists must incorporate at least 50% of wood in each piece. The annual exhibition features functional and non-functional works, studio furniture, turnings, constructions, sculpture and vessels in which artists use wood as their primary medium. Opening Reception and Awards Ceremony: Saturday, November 18 5-8pm
  4. Maple rustic chair

    From the album Construction projects

    I had a few bucks and bought the logman x pro log tenon maker. I have a big property in which I scavenged some maple dead fall. This is the first in log furniture I have tried. It takes pretty big forstner bits to drill out too. Can't wait to see the overall and I've figured out how to do It quickly. This is time consuming but I'm excited!
  5. Starting a new project a head shaped bookshelf made from red oak. The customer could not find anyone that would even consider doing this project for him. I got the design finalized and emailed the itemized bid to him and I was kind of hoping my bid would scare him into not doing the project but all he said was do you want half to start. This is the design he accepted. It will be about 3 1/2 feet wide, 5 1/2 feet tall and 11 1/2 inches deep.
  6. Enzo Mari - Meh

    Nick Offerman posted a photo of an Enzo Mari dining set that they were proud to have made for a customer. FYI, Enzo is/was an famous italian designer. Ugh, not my taste. Someone commented, "This style just looks like the very bad chairs made in a first year woodshop class. These are the kind of chairs I would keep in my garage and when questioned, shrug my shoulders and say, "Well, I made it out of scraps"" Can't decide if they used drywall screws or nails like the originals. Notice there's three different styles of chairs, each with different seats and backs. Whaddya think?
  7. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  8. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1966 Antique Cradle This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 04/29/2017 Category Furnishings  
  9. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  10. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1966 Nautical Attic Bedroom This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 04/29/2017 Category Furnishings
  11. A lady came my to shop today;

    Good Evening Friends, A lady came to my shop today and brought a chair with a broken leg and wanted to know if I could fix it? I looked the chair over and told her that we would have to shoot it because the leg was too far broken, just like you do a horse when it breaks his leg in a race. She exclaimed Really? Then I started to laugh and she then settled down. She stated that she had an awful time finding someone with knowledge enough to fix the leg. She also stated that if she had not found me on the internet that she didn't know what to do with the chair. She further stated that our work in repair and restoration is becoming a thing of the past and I informed her that when I am no longer here that it would be even harder to find someone because no one wants to learn the trade anymore. She came from 50 miles away. How do you all feel about this topic?
  12. Cherry Entertainment Towers Posted 8/25/2007 11:36 PM CDT Had been encouraged by the wife to build these for some time now. Spent maybe a year checking other designs an making plans. Tracking my time and will give it when finish. The towers are 6 ft tall X 22 inch wide and 24 inch deep.Caucus began with making raised panels for the sides. The sizes basically echo the interior. The panels are prefinished with BLO and Garnet Shellac for base color. Will cover all with varnish on exterior when complete. Glue up of a panel this size and number of panels was a challenge and provided several lessons in how to get the panels and rail in evenly. Dados cut into rails to fit plywood shelves and make for a more secure joint. Caracas glue up using blocks cut to ensure square. Sides are rabbited to give more glue area for face frames. Face frames are joined together with pocket screws. Caracas with face frame attached now ready for base of 2X4 lumber with covering of cherry with simple molded edge The crown molding was a 4 piece made at the router table (top plate, crown and cove) and tablesaw (dentel) This is what the build on the molding looks like. After a few years we got rid of the old tv for an LED so needed a stand.. Made this to fit the existing spot and placed wheels on it for ease of wiring. Shelves made to fit existing equipment . Was expecting to place the bass in the large hole and place a door on it but changed my mind after reading about magnets and tvs. Used pocket screws for a hump over the wheels so that they do not appear to the eye, This almost makes the shlf look like it is floating . Once trim was added to front wheels are covered. Forgot to take a pic of the completed stand so had to stop and do that. The top is beaded and has a beaded molding added plus a cove.
  13. Garden Bench plans

    Below (hopefully) is what I want to build. Does anyone have plans? I know it is 5ft long. For outdoor stuff I always fully radius all horizontal pieces. So the stringers, Arm rest and back top and bottom may get radius and the bottom get a saw curf. This is to keep the water off and to stop it from hanging on the bottom edges. Any ideas on how to reverse engineer this would be appreciated.
  14. Can anyone name the two major/general categories of furniture? It's true, all furniture can be narrowed to two main categories, what are they? No Googling! Your own brain please! By the way, if you've watched Roy Underhill at all, the answer was in one of his episodes, that's how I learnt of this cool subject!
  15. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. A great throwback for your bath area or any room. This old plan has a nice set of dimensions, leaving you the builder with plenty of room for artistic interpretation. Have fun!
  16. View File Workbench Magazine January-Feburary 1966 Old Fashioned Wash Stand This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. A great throwback for your bath area or any room. This old plan has a nice set of dimensions, leaving you the builder with plenty of room for artistic interpretation. Have fun! Submitter John Morris Submitted 09/24/2016 Category Furnishings  
  17. Lately (last year or so) I have had a penchant and thirst for knowledge on a more academic level, for anything related to woodworking and the items made from wood, and the tools and process's used to make wood items. This quest for knowledge has come from my own desire to build a woodworkers wiki, where all can enter the wiki, and open edit and collaborate, and contribute to the knowledge base. Click here for our wiki under construction. As many know by now, our wiki is under construction, and it's turned out to be a monumental task, the software behind the scenes is very complex, and the wiki engine is a different animal that takes some getting used to, in order to use it. But once our wiki is built, and once we open the doors, it will be relatively user friendly, compared to most wikis, and you will enjoy contributing and leaving your mark in cyberspace, for all woodworkers to benefit from, and learn, and share. Now that is out of the way, and some context has been laid down, I wanted to share with you a wonderful book I have been reading, it's a general history of American Furniture, and how the design components came to be, and how specific joinery was introduced into the market, and how the styles morphed from one to another, and how our society and the differing economic classes influenced furniture design. The book is named "Sotheby's Guide to American Furniture". It's a paper back written by Patricia P. Petraglia and I have been reading it over the last couple months, just before bed time. Yes, it's a sleeper, but it is also very interesting. A few weeks ago I came upon the chapter that finally described the period in which the Dovetail joint made its appearance in our colonies. If you've read this far, you may be interested in reading a paragraph on this subject from the above mentioned book. The less sophisticated shops were still using peg and mortise and tenon for everything, and they were still building the bulky style of "Pilgrim Furniture" of the late 1600's, specifically from 1640 - 1690. But, the Pilgrim Furniture was beautiful as well, so we shouldn't sneeze down on those builders, there were intricate carvings, beautifully raised panels, Jewels and Boss's, Split Spindles, and turned feet. But the William and Mary designs just took the colonies by storm, and the makers either had to transition their shops, or die. In a way you could say, the dovetail joint, was responsible for the demise of many shops, not all makers could adapt! I love history, especially American History, and this book I found sitting on the shelf of a used book store here locally where I live has a place on my nightstand, and I am taking my time to read it, and absorb it. It's amazing what was actually involved in design, and style, and how our society and economic classes played such a huge roll in the designing of our American furniture. Thanks for reading, and I hope when we open our new wiki, you'll be motivated to share your knowledge, and resources for all to see, read and learn.
  18. Version 1.0.0

    15 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. These old Workbench Magazine's were fairly light on the detail, but with some prior knowledge and experience you can use this plan as a great jumping off point to build this wonderful piece of furniture history.
  19. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1965 Colonial Cradle This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. These old Workbench Magazine's were fairly light on the detail, but with some prior knowledge and experience you can use this plan as a great jumping off point to build this wonderful piece of furniture history. Submitter John Morris Submitted 05/21/2016 Category Furnishings
  20. A little something for those who like to design custom furniture. This came from a series of "clicks" beginning at a Twitter post by Kinderhook Woodcraft. https://hillbillydaiku.com/2016/05/06/tables-and-seating-in-hillbilly-proportions/ Here's a image that the site owner developed. Using the image for design is explained at the above link.
  21. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. These old Workbench Magazine's were fairly light on the detail, but with some prior knowledge and experience you can use this plan as a great jumping off point to build this wonderful piece of furniture history.
  22. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1965 Pole Screen and Candle Stand This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. These old Workbench Magazine's were fairly light on the detail, but with some prior knowledge and experience you can use this plan as a great jumping off point to build this wonderful piece of furniture history. Submitter John Morris Submitted 05/10/2016 Category Furnishings

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