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Found 26 results

  1. corner cabinet layout

    Guys, this is the next project on the list. It's a corner cabinet it will be 28" tall and about 18" wide, I have sketched out a full size drawing with the corner angles does this look like the best way to build this unit?
  2. until
    The Annual Management Conference, Exhibition and Plant Tours occurs every Fall. This exciting event offers a unique opportunity for attendees to participate in an outstanding education program, meet and network with industry peers and key suppliers and tour select members’ facilities.
  3. Cabinet in Wood Magazine

    I really like that cabinet in the last mag. I got. I think it would work out for our kitchen for storage. Think I might build one. Any one else got any comments?
  4. MAKE A GUESS

    I made this about 35 years ago. Make a guess on (what kind of wood) and what is it. Preston
  5. Weekend Shop Time

    Well, I was able to get out in the shop for a little while this week end and get the door and drawer fronts on. Ready to paint. Maybe, i can talk the wife to do this while i am laid up, otherwise it will not get painted until April I have a little tweaking on the gaps, otherwise all set to go under the router table after paint
  6. I showed the glue up for this in an earlier post. Got it all put together yesterday and is now in its place in the kitchen. I have not had time to do the drawers as yet. It will have 2 drawers on slides and 2 small box drawers accessible from either side. The center cubby is for cook books.
  7. Pine Upper Cabinet

    From the album Southwest Kitchen Cabinets

    These upper cabinets were built as three separate units, the little cubby's below are for wine. I installed 1/4" wire mesh in the doors to keep it rustic and my customer wanted to display the contents of the cabinets. There is also lighting installed at the top inside of these cabinets. You'll see in the corner there is also a little appliance cubby I built as well.
  8. Shaker Cabinet Drawing

    Here is a shop drawing I made up awhile back for a customer. It's a base cabinet, the cabinet was made from solid pine and poplar then painted. Feel free to use the drawing for inspiration. 1 square = 1" Here are the links to the project: Pine Cabinets Shaker Style Part 1 Pine Cabinets Shaker Style Part 2 Pine Cabinets Shaker Style Part 3 How to Make an Adjustable Sawtooth Shelf System
  9. Version 1.0.0

    6 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. I bet most of us can remember the good ol sewing machine cabinet that mom or grandma used to own. They were well built, classic, and beautiful. Here is a great chance to get to know one inside out, and possibly even build your own. Have fun!
  10. View File Workbench Magazine Mar-Apr 1965 Sewing Machine Cabinet This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. I bet most of us can remember the good ol sewing machine cabinet that mom or grandma used to own. They were well built, classic, and beautiful. Here is a great chance to get to know one inside out, and possibly even build your own. Have fun! Submitter Courtland Submitted 11/06/2015 Category Furnishings
  11. Finally, A Case for My Planes

    This week, I finally built a case to house all of my planes that have been gathering dust and taking up valuable space on my bench. I built the case from walnut and tulip that came from my local county. I used tulip to accent the darker planes but built the dividers from walnut. The angled display board is hinged so that I can stuff extra "parts" behind it. Never waste space in a small shop. I do with that I would have built the rack at a 60 degree angle instead of 70 degree. The planes are stable but I would feel better with 10 more degrees of tilt. The sides are dovetailed for strength and the glass is simply 1/8" glass. I toyed with putting tempered glass in but didn't want that much extra weight hanging. The door has a pair of rare earth magnets to keep it closed. The case is hung with a french cleat. For those of you guys who have been in my shop, I put it on the south wall next to the window. I'm running out of wall space so I may have to build a new shop. As for the planes, there are three that I wanted to protect to hand down to my son. The Bailey 24 on the top rack was my grandfathers plane, the Stanley next to it was my father's and the Stanley next to it was probably one of the first tools I ever purchased about 45 years ago. Notice that I left an extra space next to the Firestone. My son's plane will go there so that the whole thing may be passed to my grandson. Here's the pictures empty and full.
  12. From the album Green Egg Tables

    A custom Green Egg Table with Cabinets and pull out Drawers.

    © John Moody

  13. Yep, drawer Wars. As in, a fight to the finish between me and that evil dovetail jig. Fought to get the router set up, fight to get the jig set up. Fight to get two drawers to go together..... The Jig in use I figure at least I could try to do both drawers at the same time.. Not the greatest of fits, Got the sides and front ripped and planed to size, then this mess starts up. Well, coping saw to close a few gaps. BIG ball pean to close others. Getting late Well this morning, I moved that jig out of my sight, needed to room on the bench. Drawer sides were almost 3" too long. Trimmed them for length. Ripped and crosscut a board to get two pieces for backs, and set them aside. Set up another router, hoping it would do it's job. Needed grooves for the plywood bottoms. Set up the fence and the height of the bit. Then hunted for the cord to plug the router into. Yep, that $23 router table and router. Had the bottoms cut to size and even sanded it a bit. Needed that to check on the width of the groove. Took a second cutting. Then two clamps, and a bunch of glue for the front, and some glue and screws for the backend. Once I had found how wide the back needed to be. One screw to hold the bottom to the back, two on each corner, The doveatils were on their own, though sat the completed drawers in their new homes, once I figured out which went where. Needed to make something for them to slide around on. Some OLD 1x2 strapping, with the staples removed, four pieces were cut. Drilled three pilot holes in each. Set one end even with the front runner/stretcher, and finger clamped it in place. Set the combo square to set the height for the rest of the runner, three screws, and some Elmers. Finger Clamps? By Visegrip of course.. This was after the fourth runner was added. Next? Well, the BOSS wanted a cabinet on one end, so Had some extra plywood and some cleat stock sitting around, cut one panel for the drawer end. Had to notch for the runners, as the front one would be where a few screws would wind up. Panel is a bit shy of full width, by a 3/16" or so. Screwed to the legs and the front runner. One end is done, needed a back as well. It needed a cleat or two, but it is now in place And have added a cleat for the other side panel...that I still need to cut out. Then maybe, just maybe, build a DOOR for this thing? I am thinking this will be more for "Cookie Sheets and the like" and might not need a shelf inside. Don't think shelf pins will hold in 1/4" ply, anyway. Still have to final fit the drawers, and sand them to paint grade ( Guess who wants to paint it?). Even found two Kanoobies that match the ones in the kitchen! Have until Thursday afternoon to get something else done. On Med Leave right now...
  14. My first go at hand cutting DTs. The drawer material is 3/4 pine from the BORG (2 drawers 24" sq outside on Blummotion heavy duty slides) The project is a pedestal for a front loading washer dryer It's made from  mortised 2-by material. Shelled in with half inch birch. Will be filled and  painted to match the appliances. nothing fancy Rise height 24" or thereabouts  (emphasis on the thereabouts) The wheels in the rear  are swivel type the ones  in the front are Great Lakes Casters that pick the wheel up off the floor when I rotate a little star-wheel in the caster in order to lock them  Three in front three in the back.   I used my hand made DT saws.  Note one is brass backed the other  still has the back that came it from the BORG when it was a sheet rock mud scraper.  I got lazy.  Both are 24 TPI.   Getting the "hang" for the handle was a bit of a trick as I didn't even know about "hang" when I started.  I made the saws mounted handles and  when I started a cut they just stuck solid like they were nailed to the wood.  The handle's angle and location is important.   The project       Some tools     My two DT saws           The first Drawer all glued up with the bottom ( half inch Birch)     Just stop and think about this a moment. All kinds of guys looking at some crappy pine drawer cobbled together with hand tools  the fit is  - well  - - hey it's an effort - and it's some guy's first effort at cutting the joints and some people find this interesting? Really???   REALLY????? Well you may just BE a woodworker  = coz ain't no one else going to find it interestin' ~!!!     I haven't built a moxxon vice so I just used the project to hold the drawer sides.   Marking out the pins or are they tails - - it gets so Konfoozin       Ohh look~!!  they might just fit.           Fitment detail to follow         And the thing is square too              
  15. Old Fashion Spice Cabinet

    From the album Pine Is Fine Custom Cabinets and Furniture

    This handcrafted spice cabinet is made from solid red oak hardwood. The door is raised panel, it has an exterior and interior shelf and a single drawer for additional storage.
  16. Bathroom Storage

    From the album Primitive Bathroom Storage

    Bathroom cabinet cabinet made for a friend

    © Lewis Kauffman

  17. English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album Old English Plate Shelf

    Young Patriot Woodworkers, they are not ready to see this one leave our shop. As with any project that takes time, it becomes part of the family, and the kids always hate to see it leave the shop.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  18. English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album Old English Plate Shelf

    The customers pewter molds on full display. The pewter molds are one area of his vast collections of antique in his home. These molds were used to make breads, bread puddings, and puddings, in the shape of the molds.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  19. English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album Old English Plate Shelf

    The curls are wonderful in this lumber, thank you Bob Kloes.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  20. English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album Old English Plate Shelf

    In place at a home where the resident loves colonial works, and this piece fit right in.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  21. English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album Old English Plate Shelf

    The cabinet in place at its final resting place, with pewter molds in place. You'll see the tails are cut into the side of the cabinet and exposed, I set the tails on the side of the cabinet to lend it downward strength, the mechanics of the joinery will not allow any weight to push down and separate the corners.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  22. From the album Gene's Stuff

    Solid oak trophy cabinet. Sliding glass doors and purchased glass door hardware. 48" wide. 36" high 9" deep. one coat of Watco Light Walnut and four coats of home made wipe on poly.
  23. My Daughter's Kitchen Cabinets

    Last month my daughter's refrigerator died so she bought a fancy smancy side by side with ice in the door. It is also three inches wider that her old one so her upper cabinet came down and the base cabinet had to be remove to accommodate the frig. My job was to remake the upper and lower cabinet. Originally the cabinet to the right of the refrigerator dropped straight down and rested 18 inches above the base unit so instead, I built the upper cabinet all the way to the wall and built a shelves below the cabinet. I then remade the base unit without a drawer (her request and I didn't complain). Though the pictures don't show it, I'm installing a LED dimmable light under the shelf to brighten the dark corner. Next job........ a communion table from reclaimed pews.
  24. Anyone ever seen this type of hinge available?
  25. For my latest project building some pine cabinets for a customer of mine, he has requested that the upper cabinet has a sawtooth shelf support system. He loves the old timey look it offers, and I like it too. Sawtooth Shelf supports come in various sizes, various angles are used for aesthetics, and you are not even regulated to sawtooth configurations, you can angle the notches at virtually any angle you like. It appears the builder of the supports in this image to the left angled their notches at around 15 degrees. We angled ours at 45 degrees. So yesterday I took to laying out and cutting the sawtooth adjustable shelve supports. I did not use any specific dimensions for the layout as you'll see, I just went with what I thought would work, and offer enough strength for the heaviest of loads in my customers cabinet. In our case the upper cabinet is 41" tall with an inside height of 35 inches. So I ripped down 4 pieces of pine at 2" in width and I cross cut them on my miter saw at 36 inches in length just to allow for some custom fitting after they are made. It is very important to make sure that the entire operation is done while the 4 support blanks are grouped as one, this way you are ensured that when the supports are installed, the notches will be directly across from each other and you will not have wobbly shelves due to mis-aligned sawtooth notches. So to keep my orientation good, I bundled them together and secured them with blue tape, I then trimmed them together so we have a reference point that agrees with all the blanks. Next I laid out the notches with a simple marking square, I did not even bother with measuring as the eye will never be able to tell if one notch is a 1/6" different from the next, and since they are all ganged up together, the notches will be directly across from each other once installed in the cabinet, so they will all be off a tad equally. For this one I laid them out using the default 45 degrees available on this square, and I drew the line to what I felt was a comfortable distance about 1 1/2" long at 45 degrees. The numbers on the rule mean absolutely nothing so don't get hung up on the numbers. Flip the square for the 90 degree lines and intersect them. Continue this layout procedure all the way down the board. By the way, I marked lines across the board at 6" from the top, and 6" from the bottom, since it is highly unlikely a shelf would be placed that close to the top or bottom of the cabinet. So I started my layout at 6" from the top, and worked my way down to the bottom to the 6" mark. It only took a few minutes to get my layout lines down and ready for the table saw. I did my 45 degree cuts first, I don't know why, it just moved me to do them first for some reason. You must take care not to let the kerf of the blade float into the other layout line, or you'll have some very ugly notches. Then I set the blade at 90 degrees and commenced to cutting those lines, again, just because you have lines that are (insert dimension here) long, it does not mean you can set your blade at that height, you need to stay away from the layout line at the intersections or the points, or you'll have a very messed up looking point, we are going to clean that area up next to form a nice point. By the way I am using my factory provided table saw miter with a backer board for the above operation. A close up of the finished table saw operation will show you why I stated to stay away from the tip of the notches! If you cut to the tip, you will intersect the blade kerfs and it will cause some irreversible damage to your nice notches. Next I took the gang of 4 to the bandsaw and finished up the notches to intersect the tips of the notches nicely. I happened to have my 3/4" resaw blade on the BS so I just left it on there, and it worked out great. You'll notice the small problem I ran into, I could only finish the notches near the ends of the boards as the other end of the bundle would hit the yolk on the BS. So I could not get to the middle of the shelf supports to clean them up by the bandsaw. So to finish the cut on the notches near the center of the bundle, I took to a gents saw and a chisel and finished them up that way. I clamped the boards down to the bench for two reasons, first to secure them obviously, second, I wanted them all to be flush so when we finish up the notches by hand, they will be cut the exact same depth. Pare down to the intersecting lines after you have cut them with the saw. To finish them up and make my sawtooths look nice and clean, I ripped a 45 into a strip of pine and wrapped sand paper around it and used it like a sanding file of sorts to get right down in there and make them look nice and crisp. The last step I took is to cut the tips of the teeth off. I feel that if we did not do this, they would just get knocked off during normal use anyway (and, that is just the way they are supposed to look judging by other cabinets I researched.) Notice the grain direction in relation to the tips in the photo above, that is just asking for trouble for those points to be knocked off during use. I took the ganged up boards, back over to the table saw and I ripped a 1/4" off the teeth, leaving a net width of 1 3/4" from when we started at 2" at the beginning of our shelf support project. I only cut two boards deep at a time, since I have a 12" blade on my TS I could have done the entire stack in one pass, but I know that most woodworkers run a 10" blade on their TS and I was not sure if a 10" blade could cut 3" stack of boards in one pass so for the sake of our readers, I did it in two passes. Cut one side and flip it over, and cut the other. And now we have some nice looking sawtooth shelf supports!!! The only thing we need to do is cut 4 sticks of pine 45'd at both ends since I have two shelfs going in to the cabinet, we need two supports for each shelf. I will cut those sticks once the vertical supports are in place in the cabinet. Total time for these shelf supports were 1 hour. And we have some very strong, nice looking supports that will add an awe factor to any case project you may have.

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