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Found 100 results

  1. chopping block bowl

    This is truly a magnificent bowl, there is so much waste of wood. I saw a video where a guy used a curved cutter to remove and save the center wood to make smaller bowls.
  2. Spent the day riding herd on a bunch of electronics technology students. Our company left early so I have a chance to post this weeks entry. @Steve Krumanaker posted another installment of his laser project. His "Cryptex" is so cool! Check out the complete post and the comments from our Patriot family- @Gerald showed us his hollow vessel turned from spalted magnolia and it is a beauty- Gerald tells us a little more in his post- @PostalTom turned a sweet little bowl made from walnut and poplar. I really like his choice of woods and the small lip at the top. Read what our turners had to say- There is a lady turner, Holly Denney, who I have seen on Facebook. She makes turned snowmen/snowladies. Another turner, who also makes snow people is Mr. David Reed Smith. He recently put up his article on how he does his turnings. The main article is located at- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.html Within his article is a link to a full PDF tutorial- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.pdf And a link to his gallery of his work- http://davidreedsmith.com/Gallery/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.html If you have ever turned a bottle stopper, you probably know of Ruth Niles and her stainless steel stoppers. In my opinion you cannot find a better stopper (or a nicer person). Ruth has a really nice combo starter kit on her website. Check it out- https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/woodturning/product/6322-five-star-kit Mike Peace recently added a nice little video on scrapers. Specifically he shows us how to make a burnishing tool to add a burr to a scraper. If you live in or around the Portland Oregon area, the American Association of Woodturners is having a symposium June 14-16. Check out their site for more information-http://www.woodturner.org/default.asp?page=2018Portland I've had 3 pieces of Manzanita laying on the lathe for about a month- trying to see what I can create. I finally decided on a piece to start with but the area to be turned was off center on the piece. Because it would be off balanced, I need to figure a way to mount it. As luck would have it, a turner I follow- Jim Jakosh, posted a similar off balance project and his solution- a counterbalance. I had a shop made hold down for finishing off bowl bottoms. I glued the piece- paper joint- to the wheel. Then added some bolts to the outer rim to create a balanced spin. Spun without vibration and so far the paper joint is holding. I'll just have to see what materializes from within the root. Safe turning
  3. Newest Bowl

    Here is my latest effort. This is the bowl that was in work when I posted the pictures of the curtain and dust trough on my lathe. Top and bottom are poplar, center is walnut. I wanted to try my hand at mixing species. I don't really like this one, the proportions look wrong to me. My son and DIL like it, so it's theirs now.
  4. Rough turned

    I rough turned one of the bowl blanks. I am terrible at identifying types of wood. I'm sure some of you will know what it is.
  5. Temperature was in the 70's here the past two days but that's about to come to an end tonight. It was just too nice to do much in the shop. Just a heads up for those near Secaucus, NJ. Our most generous sponsor Easy Wood Tools will be at the Woodworking Show there- Click on the image for more details and ticket information. Last weeks "Wednesday's..." started a great discussion on pricing your work. @DAB asked about how we set the price on our turnings. Check out what our turners had to say. @Steve Krumanaker sent me a link for a fantastic turner named Virgil Leih. I had not known of him but I can say when he does something- he goes BIG! I really think you will enjoy watching what he does!! Thanks, Steve! @difalkner posted some Longworth Chuck plates he made There was a great discussion about the layout of the arcs. Read all of the information- @HandyDan came up with an inspired way to add treads to a project. You really need to see this tutorial! Read the complete step-by-step- @RustyFN posted some pictures of prepping a log into future bowl blanks He also received some advice about sealing the blanks to help slow down the cracking- @Gene Howe sent me a link to a turner and machinist. Gene was at a gathering of Arizona woodturners and Jerry Marcantel was demonstrating some of the turning devices he has developed. Here is a video from Jerry's YouTube channel. He has other videos there as well. Thanks, Gene!! This link is to his website- https://www.woodturnerstools.com/ . He has some beautiful turnings posted there. A short video from Mike Peace making a shaving brush. Not extremely difficult and would probably make a nice present for someone. Safe Turning
  6. Well, if you haven't gotten your significant other a Valentine's present by now, I hope you can get comfortable sleeping next to the lathe for the next several days @RustyFN showed us his first turned lidded box and it is gorgeous. Read about it here and check out the comments from our turners- Carl Jacobson turned a floating vase, about a month ago. Notice his use of Easy Wood Tools and the Easy Wood chuck! I think if I hadn't learned to turn, I might have tried my hand at painting. I always marveled at the painters on public television when they created a picture. Although he has passed away, Bob Ross was one I enjoyed. That's probably why I found this Tim Yoder turning video so amusing- Some of you may have an income from your turning. With tax season upon us, I thought this video from Mike Peace may be of interest- Check some of the comments, with the video, on YouTube. Several respondents were folks who worked as tax consultants and they added additional information. Rick turnes added his list of videos for January 2018- The Woodworking Show is going to be in Kansas City, MO this weekend- February 16 and 17. Our most generous sponsor Easy Wood Tools will be there! Check here for additional information- Click on the above image to link to more information. I have been playing with a little holly bowl. The wood came from a tree that was planted, in 1969, at the school where I taught. The tree had been cut back many times over the years due to size a weather damage so none of the trunk pieces were extremely large- although the base near the ground is close to 2 feet across. I turned the bowl green- the outside shape one evening and finished the inside the next day. The wall thickness is about 3/16". There were a couple of stress cracks in the log before I started but they didn't get any larger after completion. The inertia sander I made works great! The pictures are before any finish is applied. I'm using rattle can lacquer but need to get a buffing wheel to smooth the surface of the spray. You can see the bowl went from round to slightly oblong during the process. When it is finished, I'll give it to the school. I still have a couple more chunks and also a holly natural edge bowl but some of the bark split off during the final turning. I also finished up the piece I was turning from Manzanita. It had that large void that I filled with Alumilite. I couldn't get the "bowl" part polished as well as I would have liked. Everything went south when I tried to use Micromesh pads. I guess it was the difference in the density between the wood and acrylic. Also the pads left traces of their color on the wood. I should mention that I did not stabilize the Manzanita. I'm calling this one "Crater" because it reminds me of a volcano. Finally, I guess someone likes my rolling pins. Got this in the mail today- Who a thunk it?? Safe turning
  7. turned this today. will give it away.
  8. Segmented bowl

    I don't do turning, but have some friends that do. Here is a recent one that one top honors at the local Woodcraft store. In the last couple years, he's gotten into segmented turning and has some neat fixtures to help glue them up. The ghostly stool is a reflection in the glass display case.
  9. We were in the midst of the famous "Pennsylvania January Thaw" but winter returned today. Cold and windy with a few flurries. Our Patriot Turners were busy this past week producing some gorgeous objects. @Steve Krumanaker Created a beautiful maple bowl with the help of Mother Nature- See Steve's post and the comments he received here- Steve also made a fantastic display holder. This one is destined to hold humming birds but he also uses this type of display to show his turned ornaments. You can see more images and additional information at in his post at While on the subject of turned ornaments, @Ron Altier is getting a jump on next year! This is his latest creation Ron answered questions about the piece in his post- @HandyDan Made some more Tops. He talks about some difficulties he had and what he did to resolve the problem. Read his post and see what material he found works perfectly for these little toys- Our friends and a most generous Patriot sponsor, Easy Wood Tools ( @Jim from Easy Wood Tools ) shared a video by Carl Jacobson on making a hybrid resin art piece. Carl uses the Easy Wood Tools to create this beautiful project. I've been experimenting with the Alumilite casting resin. Lots of possibilities but I'll need to add some specialized equipment if I want to make casting without imperfections. Tim Yoder posted a new video on making a dead blow mallet. What is really cool are the materials/methods Tim used. He creates his own thread chase and die for the project. Check out the Easy Wood Chuck, too! We always try to post the latest Rick Turns, video for the month's woodturning videos. Rick posted a summary of 2017 on YouTube- Last week I mentioned I was playing with a piece of Manzanita. The piece had a void that I was afraid would separate during turning. I wanted to fill the void with Alumilite and then complete the turning. You may remember I sealed the piece with modeling clay to create a barrier to contain the liquid casting resin. That turned out not to be such a good idea. The clay did contain the resin but it was nearly impossible to remove all of the clay from the nooks and crannies of the wood. I ended up using a heat gun (on low) to melt the pieces of remaining clay and air pressure to blast out the liquid clay. (Note to self: wear an apron so you don't ruin another sweatshirt). This process is certainly going to affect the type of finish I'll be able to use. On the positive side, the casting resin is holding the piece together. I sanded everything to 4000. That's great for the wood but the resin needs to go to 12000. I have the micromesh pads and I'll need to do the final sanding by hand. I think the finished piece will make a nice change/key holder or a place for extra paper clips. Safe Turning
  10. We had some snow here, about 4", but it came in spurts- just enough each time that it needed shoveling. 4 driveways X 3 times. @Gerald posted a question about how quickly his turned bowls dried. He wondered if it was related to his shop environment. Take a look at his post and offer any suggestions you might have- @Smallpatch (Jess) posted some chess pieces he made, a week or so ago. He followed up with a description of what he used to finish the pieces so they would look identical to the originals. Read his explanation and additional comments- @Steve Krumanaker turned a gorgeous maple bowl and then added to its' beauty by decorating the bottom with one of his fantastic woodburnings. Steve also answered questions about the woodburning design he used. If you have turned a bowl, you have probably experienced grain tearout of at some point on the turning. The change in direction of the grain can be really difficult to cut cleanly. Here is a video from John Lucas on shear scraping. He is demonstrating how to help reduce the tearout. A while back, @Ron Altier was experimenting with a chatter tool. Mike Peace put up this video on turning tops and decorating them using the chatter tool. I typically use a clear finish on my turnings- oil, poly, wax or whatever. I like to see the work of nature in the grain patterns and colors. There are some turners who prefer to decorate with other media. I saw this and thought it was neat. It's from John Clothier- Not much turning for me. I finished the "sure my husband can fix that" project. I actually got to use the lathe for part of it. The broken leg was reattached with dowels but I had to replace some of the wood to eliminate the voids left by the previous repair job. I ended up turning an odd sized dowel for the repair. I was working on a Manzanita root and as I turned into it I found the voids were deeper and more extensive that I realized. I'm going to try and save the turning by adding some Alumilite into the voids. To keep the liquid from running out, I've sealed up the blank with modeling clay. Hope it works! Safe Turning
  11. Bowl for my daughter

    Finally got back on my lathe. When my daughter saw this fruit bowl I had made for my wife, which I posted on back in October, she wanted something similar. This is what I came up with for her. It started out as four pieces of 8/4 poplar. I edge glued two pieces together, then edge glued the other two pieces together, then face glued those two chunks together to make a big blank. I wanted to try my hand at making a bowl that was pretty much at the maximum diameter allowed for my lathe. With that heavy of a blank, I was a little wary of it flying off the chuck. I screwed on a face plate and turned the bottom and the chuck mortise, then mounted it on the chuck, and turned the inside very gently until I had removed some of the weight. Finishing was a coat of Bullseye Sealcoat sanding sealer, followed by a coat of amber shellac, and then three coats of spray lacquer. I haven't given it to her yet; I hope she likes it. I turned it with a combination of Easy Wood Tools, and a traditional 3/8" bowl gouge I purchased from a gentleman on this site. This is my fourth bowl. Thanks for looking.
  12. Well I made it through the Christmas holiday- mostly by hiding out in the basement shop! Member @Cliff posed a question about salvaging a warped bowl blank. Check out some of the suggestions and see if you can give Cliff some help- @Steve Krumanaker posted a beautiful natural edge walnut bowl. Keeping that much bark intact is quite a feat!! Check out his post and the comments here- @HandyDan set me a link to a really cool video about making multiple copies of little wooden horses- on the lathe! Although the audio is in German (I think), it is really neat to see how they duplicated the horses. There are additional items being made on the lathe- all from a log round! I found a couple of videos on making platters. I think they are easier to make than bowls. First from Carl Jacobson- And the second one from Tim Yoder- Tim's video is a two parter and the second part is linked on his YouTube site. Also, check out Tim's use of the Easy Wood Chuck! While hiding out in the basement, I had the chance to experiment with a new (for me) turning media.I wanted to try my hand at some acrylic casting/turning. During a visit to Hobby Lobby, I found some "Alumilite" brand casting resin- Hobby Lobby has 40% off coupons which brought the price down to about $20. I've had a little experience with casting in the past. I really didn't want to have to buy molding materials for a simple turning so I stopped by the "Dollar Store" and bought a 3-pack of plastic cereal bowls- I figured this would make a fine mold to cast a blank for turning another bowl. Even if the resin didn't release the casting, I could just turn away the blue plastic. I must admit, that most of these ideas came from Carl Jacobson and Peter Brown's YouTube videos. Anyway, The little blue bowls held 2.5 cups of liquid. The resin pack was enough for 4 cups of liquid. Using Mr. Brown's idea of including a wooden lathe mounting piece molded into the casting and some extra filler, I figured I could get away with 2 cups of resin. I turned a bowl shaped piece of wood- not hollowed- for the mount and used a bunch of lathe shavings for the filler. Mixed up the resin and poured the blank. The instructions indicate that the ideal temperature is 70° or higher for the chemical reaction/hardening. Hmmm, 60° in the basement- the solution- My seed starter heating pad and a cardboard cover to trap the heat and 24 hours later, the results- Unmolding wasn't a problem either. I drilled a small hole on the center of the plastic bowl and used air pressure to pop the casting free. When I worked making casting, years ago, we either used vacuum chambers or pressure chambers to eliminate any tiny bubbles that may have been trapped in the casting material. I had neither method so I expected a few voids- I think if the casting would have been done in a warmer environment, there would not have been as many of these defects. I used the chuck screw to mount the blank to the lathe/chuck Turned the outside to shape and created a recess to reverse the blank. Sanded the outside to 12000 grit and then used Turtle Wax swirl and scratch remover. Reversed the blank and turned away the wooden insert leaving a support post to help hold the blank with the tailstock. Never having worked with this material before, I wasn't sure how thin I could make the walls. I left them a little over 1/4. Sanded/finished the outside the same way as the inside I think I need to run it through the dishwasher to clean out some of the tiny air bubble holes that trapped the Turtle Wax compound. Turned completely with Easy Wood Tools!! Safe Turning
  13. Walnut bowl, not quite round

    I roughed this bowl a few years ago and left some bark on it. By the time I got around to finish turning it the bark was pretty well toast. Rather than reduce the diameter I sanded those areas flat. I kind of like it but not sure if I'd do it again. Finish is fast drying gloss poly applied while spinning slowly. Of course I had to drop it right after I took it off the lathe, oh well, adds character I guess. Steve
  14. Spoon and Bowl

    This image is an open sourced image uploaded to this community for re-use within our community graphics. London's centre for the traditional craft of green woodwork. The Green Wood Guild is an institution based on experience, knowledge, passion & experimentation. We run courses, develop products and strive to advance the craft of Green Woodwork.

    © Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

  15. Cutting up a maple tree

    Long and wordy, go away now if you're smart. Regulars know I've had a good year. Spent a whole week learning from Glenn Lucas, more recently did a workshop day Cindy Drozda. Glenn's main source of income is bowls, lots of them. He will routinely process around three hundred or more bowls at a time, I think that's right. Everything from chainsawing the blanks to drying, to finishing. He has retail outlets that sell his bowls and order regularly. Cindy Drozda is known for her delicate finials, elegant hollow forms and working with exotic one of a kind pieces of wood. Most of her items are one off and sell for a pretty penny. She also makes money from selling tools. Today, I started working up the maple log I posted a picture of earlier this week. Put on my carharts, my steel toed boots, my loggers helmet and ear plugs, my leather gloves, etc. etc. etc. Fired up the chainsaw, muscled the blanks around and trimmed them up, coated them with sealer, stacked them, etc. etc. Arms feel like rubber tonight, legs are sore, back aches a little. After much reflection I have decided...Cindy has a better plan than Glenn. Steve
  16. My latest effort

    This started out as a 8" x 8" x 2" piece of poplar. After that, the picture pretty much tell the story. It is intended for use as a fruit bowl, hence the green rim. That, by the way, didn't go as expected. I purchased a green paint pen from Hobby Lobby, intending to hold it against the rim with the lathe on its lowest speed, but the pen was the type that you have to keep depressing the nib on the end to pump the paint to the tip. That, of course, didn't work with the bowl turning, so I would up having to pump some paint to the tip, get it on the rim of the bowl, and actually "draw" it onto the rim, while periodically turning on the lathe to even out the application. It eventually worked OK, but next time I will figure out something different.
  17. What do you see?

    This is supposed to look like a rock wall or rocks in a bed of mortar. My wife says she likes it but doesn't think of rocks when she sees it. What do you see? what can I do to make it look more like a rock wall? Appreciate any and all thoughts, comments, or ideas. Oh yea, it's a work in progress. Actually, a try piece before I do this on a larger form. Honest opinions please. Steve
  18. Little pine bowl

    scrap from a 4x6 beam. will be stained and poly'd, then given as a gift to a Lady who is letting me hunt on her ranch next month.
  19. I have always wanted to take a shot at making some bowls so I finally got serious and ordered some bowl gouges last winter. A co- worker had a Hickory tree come down and I got a few pieces of it to try. Here is my first attempt at live edge turning and my first glued up bowl as well. I took them to the county fair and the live edge bowl earned a blue in the woodcrafts category while the glued up bowl took a red in recycled items. The live edge bowl is Hickory. The other is reclaimed Walnut beam, part of an Osage Orange fence post, and a scrap of Oak house trim. I really enjoyed these projects and plan to do more. Much to learn with the lathe.
  20. Very First Live edged bowl

    Started it this AM the wood is elm, damp but mostly dry so I'm going for finished dimensions.
  21. Over the past week or two I've been working on a little bowl turning it from some ironwood a friend sent me. Being this was my first experience with this wood and not knowing how it would turn, it's been slowly progressing. Well I got it almost finished. Inside turned and sanded, outside turned and sanded all that was left was to finish off the bottom. I really liked the calabash rounded look for the bottom so I would need to chuck the piece to have full access to the bottom. A doughnut chuck seemed to be the best option. When I turned the lip, I knew it was a little thin, but it felt solid. Light passing thru the lip/side transition- I was so proud of myself- Nice shape, sanded much better than I usually do. And then it happened- I was just ready to switch over to the Easy Wood Finisher when I got a catch- The force of the catch cracked the rim lip- Too much time invested in this little bowl to pitch it out. But how to remount it? The tenon is gone and the rim is uneven. After some thought and 15 minutes of US Navy adjectives, I repurposed an old lathe jig into a jamb chuck adding a piece of rubber for friction/protection. Made a flat on the bottom of the bowl and then glued it to a wooden faceplate. After the glue set, I realized I should have made a "paper"glue joint for easier removal later. Not sure what I'm going to end up with- certainly not what I originally envisioned when I started!
  22. Beautiful Spalted Bowl

    9" Spalted Coastal Goldenleaf "Bridelia Micrantha" East Coast South Africa Port Shepstone area. This is a section from a crotch cut (Inner section of a fork in a tree for the uninformed)
  23. First bowl

    Nice looking bowl Tom. I remember chasing my first bowl across the shop a couple times after a bad catch. Be sure to post it in the Turning Forum. We could use the extra traffic over there Had to do a copy and paste of a comment by HandyDan from the Woodworking forum, since I didn't know how to quote and migrate to another forum. Good suggestion Dan, here it is. The title is a little misleading, as my really first bowl wound up in pieces in the trash can. This is the bowl I turned at the basic bowl turning class I went to at the Woodcraft store in Tulsa. I picked up a mid size EWT rougher there also, and am anxious to put together a blank and try it out. The wood is Sycamore, finished with a coat of sanding sealer, and a coat of high friction polish. I didn't know there was such a thing until I took the class.
  24. Another natural edge walnut.

    I've still got at least dozen of the natural edge walnut pieces to finish up. Was kind of between projects and decided to sand and finish this one. I chose this one because it looked like my cuts were decent and it wouldn't take as much sanding as some of the others. It's about 16X12X5.5. The bark is just really nice on this one I think. It was just about to big for my little photo booth. Steve
  25. Something to look forward to.

    For the last few years I've wanted to do a week at one of the wood working or craft schools. There is a highly regarded school in Franklin IN. Marc Adams School of Woodworking. Glenn Lucas will be there in Sept. and I just registered to attend. Really looking forward to it. Steve

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