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Larry Schweitzer

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  • Content count

    28
  • Joined

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About Larry Schweitzer

  • Rank
    Gopher

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Larry
  • My Location
    Lincoln, NE, USA
  • Gender
    Male
  • My skill level is
    Advanced
  • Favorite Quote
    'Tis better to sit in the corner and be thought a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all dou.bt.
  1. New 5" Round Orbital Sanders

    We use the Dynabrade pneumatic sanders, 5" mostly peel & stick. Advantages: they are faster sanding than electric, they last a long time, pads are available for H&L or PSA, they fit hands better... Disadvantage, they suck a lot of air and need clean, dry air so they are more expensive in terms of energy use & purchase price.
  2. Trim router recommendation?

    We've had Bosch & Porter Cable. The Bosch are the preferred ones now. Commercial shop with 8 or 10 trim routers. Keep them set with different bits so you don't spend time changing bits. For those of you doing laminate, the underscribe units work well.
  3. I'm a hoarder, but not the worse

    I'm a wood hoarder. Got more than I'll ever use.
  4. It all started making wooden toys

    "Larry ...Serious big question. Any interest in doing commercial for Jakobe?" We could do that. We do work for several other shops. It is shipped with their paperwork so it looks like they did it. Things we are best at; curved casework & moldings (straight also, we have a profile grinder and make the templates on the CNC router, including the knives for rosettes.) We have a contour bander and trimer. We thermoform solid surface, (3' x 8' oven) and are a certified commercial Corian fabricator. Doweled cases: our CNC bore & insert machine will go to 8' and our case clamp will do 4' x 8' x 900mm. We have a 5' x 10' vacuum pressing table. That pizza lunch looks a lot like here. We serve lunch once a month for an employee meeting. Pizza sometimes other time we have it catered. Photo is an elliptical service counter with wood moldings.
  5. It all started making wooden toys

    Lincoln, NE
  6. Where are all the good drill bits?

    We buy a lot of tooling from European Tooling Systems. They have an on-line catalog. They stock metric bits in several variations. Carbide tipped or solid carbide, thru bore or dowel bit (brad point), several shank types. The bits we use have 10mm shanks to fit the boring block on the router or bore & insert machine. For good twist drills try MSC, they have a huge selection, online catalog and very fast delivery. And as usual, do a Google search. For my own general purpose use I've got a set of screw machine bits of M2 alloy, very hard but brittle.
  7. It all started making wooden toys

    BJ, I went to your web site, midwestcabinet.com, your shop is a lot bigger than mine. Probably more automated. Wonder if we bid the same jobs?
  8. It all started making wooden toys

    I just looked at your web site. Much larger operation than what we run. I see you are using Microvellum, us too but we are abandoning it. Made that decision about 3 years ago and have bought Top Solids. I don't use CAD so no first hand knowledge.
  9. It all started making wooden toys

    Considering what we have invested in plant, seems like we should be doing better than that. Problem is, work flow is uneven. Right now we have a pile of work. A fair amount of it is simple cabinets like if break rooms, offices, simple teller lines and straight sales counters for a string of industrial suppliers. Stuff bid against a lot of other shops that are more automated than we are. There are only 2 small jobs currently going through that are curved casework, our specialty. Last week we got a job to make 117 printer stands for a publisher, one drawer, one door, melamine, 2mm pvc, cheap! They have to go through production really fast to make a buck. I haven't seen the CAD files yet but there will likely be the parts for two of them cut from one sheet of 5x10 melamine on the router. Run time 7 minutes, change out time 2 minutes. Panel saw will stack cut the drawer bottoms, so a lot of parts in a short time. The stack can be 3" of 1/4" panels. Our bander is a medium speed machine running @ 18M/minute. so about as fast as a man can load by hand. The bore & insert machine can process on 4 stations faster than a man can handle. Assembly at the case clamp includes putting on the drawer guides and hinge plates and it takes about 3 minutes total time for each case. We clamp two drawers at a time in the drawer clamp so about 2 minutes per drawer. Then final assembly, wrapping and shipping. Lots of steps to go through for a simple cabinet.
  10. It all started making wooden toys

    A bit over 2m.
  11. Toys that started it

    The trains and the dragster were always the big hits. Lots of the simple trucks sold also in many variations. I had people come back every year and buy whatever was a new design to add to their collections, not for their kids. My designs were for kids, no metal, no sharp corners, very smooth, sturdy for the most part. I included my card with each toy sold, on the back it said guaranteed for life. I only got one back, a broken wheel. It had been used so much the crown on the wheels was worn off. I cleaned, put 4 new wheels on and sent it back to it's owner. Sometimes I would get carried away and make a one off that took way too much time. A circus train, a carrousel with horses that moved up & down as it was turned, puzzles.... Fun but not profitable.
  12. Served on an aircraft carrier during Vietnam

    Yes, carriers are a hazard. Ranger had an engine room fire while I was onboard. burned for 6 hours. The guys were trapped in the control council with the big glass window looking out into the fire, hoping it wouldn't break. It didn't only one man was lost but were had to go to Yokosuka for repairs. They flew me off the Ranger into Subic, then to Clark. From there I took a Taiwanese DC6 old prop plane to Taipei. As we gained altitude the stew came around with a dish of hard candies. I didn't care for any but she said I needed to chew them to make my ears pop because the plane leaked too much to maintain cabin pressure! Bad sign I thought. A little later there was a lot of vibration and black smoke streamed from an engine. The prop quit turning, then white smoke, the fire suppression system kicked in. I figured it was a bad sign, again! Then the pilot came on and told us we were returning to Clark due to "technical problems." The ground crew took the shrouds off the engine and oil poured out onto the tarmac. They brought out another engine on a test stand and tried to start it but after many attempts they decided to just take a cylinder assembly off of it and put it on our plane. Quite a lot of cranking and it fired up, lots of blue smoke. , Managed to get to Taiwan, then to Japan. I was sent as the engineering departments representative for the repairs.
  13. Served on an aircraft carrier during Vietnam

    Officers were supposed to eat in the general mess periodically to insure things were going well. I would take a detour through the prep areas to check them also. We only had two mess lines for the entire crew, open 23 hours a day. Food was better there than n the wardroom. When we were in Subic, I would volunteer for shore patrol duty. Better than spending the duty night on the ship. Entertaining sometimes.
  14. Toys that started it

    Some photos of the toys I made when I first started woodworking. Hard maple and walnut were the two most common woods used. But I also used many others often in combinations. For scale the cars and trucks have 2" wheels, 3/4" thick. I've got lots more photos and their were many one offs produced never photographed.

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