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clhyer

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About clhyer

  • Rank
    Joiner

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Cal
  • My Location
    Byron, Ga.
  • Gender
    Male
  • My skill level is
    Intermediate

Recent Profile Visitors

1,289 profile views
  1. Happy Birthday Olbuck!

    @olbuck - it looks like it is your day today! Hope you have a great one Buck, Cal
  2. A trick

    That is a neat trick Gene, thanks for sharing it. Cal
  3. Well, hello folks ...

    Welcome aboard Ben, Cal
  4. Another hardware search

    @lew @Stick486 @PeteM @kmealy Thanks a bunch fellas. Was out of town over the weekend or I would have replied earlier. Cal
  5. Birdhouse ornaments

    Way nice Steve, Cal
  6. Oddball things at Home Depot

    I have ordered from HD a few times. The experience is ok, but the shipping is pretty slow. The stuff leaves the warehouse 60 miles from me, near Atlanta - then goes to Columbia SC, about 4-5 hours from here where it usually sits for about a week, and then it gets shipped to the local store. If it is something I can wait for I do not mind. Amazon - that is another story. I think my feelings there have been expressed in one of the threads Stick referred to. Cal
  7. madonna and child

    Sorry Ron, I don't see 'em either. But - I understand stuff like this can bring big bucks on ebay... Cal
  8. I tried to sneak in....

    Welcome aboard Jack. Beautiful tables! Cal
  9. McCormick on the run!

    Actually, no, Gene (or maybe yes). Trees that old were planted when M&E was much smaller and lighter. Back then the practice would be to cut the central leader out to make the tree bush out, and then prune to several outbranching limbs. It makes for a beautiful tree, but the trunk length is generally short. You might yield one log in the 8' range. With much smaller equipment, each of these massive limbs would be shook individually. One tree might have to be shook up to 6 times, with the added time to move the shaker around the tree to do it. You can imagine the time savings to have a large shaker and a tree with a central leader. Even with the newer M&E that older tree requires the shaker to make multiple "grabs" of the limbs, they just do not have to reposition the shaker so many times since they now have hydraulic arms and such. I will try to get out for a couple pictures this fall. That is beautiful artwork John, and humongous orchards around you! Thanks for sharing the pics and info. Those are some "BIG" dairies too Gene. My BIL just moved here from Phoenix. He was a licensed electrician and specialized in wiring up those dairies. All that computerized equipment used today is quite mind blowing if you have not kept up with the industry. In this area even a lot of our Mennonite dairies have computerized feeding systems now. Cal
  10. If I may please. Searching for the caps to use on the bottom of table legs. I have searched all the "normal" places and all of the sites mentioned in the past week. I am not even sure what to call them, closest name I can come up with is "toe cap" but that does not yield the right stuff. Here is a pic of what I am looking for: Cal
  11. McCormick on the run!

    Gene, nut trees are quite different from fruit trees when it comes to economic life. Many of the orchards in this area are in the 80-100+ year range and still very productive. And large. No way that M&E shown in your video would work on them! My understanding is that about 20 years ago there were a lot of pecans being planted "out west". Less humidity and rain = less chemicals and input cost; however, pecans came out of the swamps and like a lot of water so "out west" farmers would have to spend more money on irrigation. This last factor may figure into a shorter economic life for them out west? I don't know the answer to that one. I would think as long as they were kept watered they would keep on keepin' on way past our "economic life". Contrast that with peaches. In this area the economic life of a peach orchard is in the 13-15 year range. Cal
  12. Current projects

    Looks like quite a production Keith, both the set and the play! Where they practicing this over the summer or has this whole thing come together since school started? There used to be a guy on the Wood forums (JL in NGa maybe?) that did work like this; and Ralph used to do this on Hee Haw IIRC, Cal
  13. Desk Parts

    I do not see where the spring goes, but have you considered just replacing the spring? Our local Ace hardware has a decent selection of small hardware including an assortment of springs. Cal
  14. McCormick on the run!

    That is a pretty young orchard Gene - not sure how useful that piece of equipment would be on a full size tree where the canopy would extend beyond the "catch". That said, for the past several years the practice of pruning young pecan trees has changed to a central leader as shown in that video. You asked about the new "orchard" type tractors. Around here, in peach orchards, they use a regular utility type tractor. Cultural practices and economics would probably be the biggest factors in the change. Tree spacing, pruning, use of herbicides and newer varieties of trees have pretty much made all that extra sheetmetal obsolete. About the only time I see a tractor in the orchard is late winter running a bush hog through after pruning; early spring spraying chemicals before new growth might block the rows or at harvest, and they only go down selected rows then. The economics come in to play as the orchard model would be a limited run, a bit more expensive - and a limited resell market, meaning less value. Utility tractors are "cheap", popular and remain in constant demand - new or used. Cal

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