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Showing most liked content on 03/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    John Morris

    Pending Projects And Improvements

    What's happening It's starting to feel like our life is settling down to a dull roar, and the suggestions and projects our members here have suggested are starting to come back to the top of our priority list, we need to move forward on these suggestions and seriously consider them as add-ons into our community. Below please see a list of pending projects as submitted by you for our consideration. Projects Clubs, (separate departments for woodworking clubs) Forms, (create forms accessible by you, in order to create tools, supplies, and machinery reviews) Add images of "What's It" to the main winners board, so they can be easily searchable for future detectives. Main landing page for The Patriot Woodworker (in progress) Wiki website for The Patriot Woodworker (in progress) Added by your feedback below Polls How to Articles Department Wood Swap Department Your feedback Your feedback on any of the items above are greatly appreciated, and if you want to add anything to our wish list of additional departments, features, or anything you like from another forum, that you don't see here, please list them in your post to this topic, and I'll add them to our dream list under "Projects" above. Thanks folks, and I look forward to seeing what you all come up with.
  2. 7 points
    Dadio

    Walnut veneer Scrap Books

    One Christmas I made a bunch of Walnut veneer scrapbooks.
  3. 6 points
    Spent the day riding herd on a bunch of electronics technology students. Our company left early so I have a chance to post this weeks entry. @Steve Krumanaker posted another installment of his laser project. His "Cryptex" is so cool! Check out the complete post and the comments from our Patriot family- @Gerald showed us his hollow vessel turned from spalted magnolia and it is a beauty- Gerald tells us a little more in his post- @PostalTom turned a sweet little bowl made from walnut and poplar. I really like his choice of woods and the small lip at the top. Read what our turners had to say- There is a lady turner, Holly Denney, who I have seen on Facebook. She makes turned snowmen/snowladies. Another turner, who also makes snow people is Mr. David Reed Smith. He recently put up his article on how he does his turnings. The main article is located at- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.html Within his article is a link to a full PDF tutorial- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.pdf And a link to his gallery of his work- http://davidreedsmith.com/Gallery/SnowPeople/SnowPeople.html If you have ever turned a bottle stopper, you probably know of Ruth Niles and her stainless steel stoppers. In my opinion you cannot find a better stopper (or a nicer person). Ruth has a really nice combo starter kit on her website. Check it out- https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/woodturning/product/6322-five-star-kit Mike Peace recently added a nice little video on scrapers. Specifically he shows us how to make a burnishing tool to add a burr to a scraper. If you live in or around the Portland Oregon area, the American Association of Woodturners is having a symposium June 14-16. Check out their site for more information-http://www.woodturner.org/default.asp?page=2018Portland I've had 3 pieces of Manzanita laying on the lathe for about a month- trying to see what I can create. I finally decided on a piece to start with but the area to be turned was off center on the piece. Because it would be off balanced, I need to figure a way to mount it. As luck would have it, a turner I follow- Jim Jakosh, posted a similar off balance project and his solution- a counterbalance. I had a shop made hold down for finishing off bowl bottoms. I glued the piece- paper joint- to the wheel. Then added some bolts to the outer rim to create a balanced spin. Spun without vibration and so far the paper joint is holding. I'll just have to see what materializes from within the root. Safe turning
  4. 6 points
    steven newman

    Next Project?

    Not feeling up to much writing...so maybe a teaser? Shelves are in sliding dovetail joints...
  5. 6 points
    Great post . Love those snowmen -women. Been busy lately getting ready to set up booth this morning. Came off good just waiting for the other four guys to get something set up in it.These are some flowers I made and bleached then colored with Chroma Craft dyes.
  6. 5 points
    Thank you Patriot Woodworker's for being here, and helping us grow.
  7. 5 points
    steven newman

    Next Project?

    Trying to get this project done BEFORE they decide what they are going to do.... Yesterday..Phone Tag all morning.....Boss wanted to go shopping all afternoon...( hour long nap in the van) Then finally a bit of shop time, after supper.. THE last can of Golden Oak in Wall E World....I found a use for those shelf blanks while they were clamped up.. Old work belt I use to strop sharpened edges. Green stick to "charge" the surface. Ok..put all of this out of the way. Mark the two side blanks as to inside, top, bottom and back..clamp one to the side of the bench.. And made sure the Wards 78 was set up just right ( was set a tad too deep.) If you don't have a sore left thumb, you ain't holding it right....That shaving is 3' long, made a mess on the floor.. This was after one board..but.. Needed this done to both of the side blanks first. Needed to figure the width of the shelves. and this rebate is hard to do when the case is assembled. Got both rebates done. Set one aside ( over on the Boss's washer..ooops) and lay out the shelf spacing. Used a piece of scrap to mark how thick the shelves were, and then a center point.. Just for "scale"...these boards are 1 x10s.. Got out the router bit, and a router guide jig.. But I needed a line to set the guide to. Measured from the center of the router's collet, out to the edge of the base...a hair under 3" Marked a line to set the fence to.. Clamp the board to the bench, clamp the fence to the line.. Double check for square, hammer to adjust, if need be. Run the router.. Repeat for the other two slots....use this completed side to layout the other side's slots.. All I needed was the line for the fence. The larger square helped with that ( Stanley No. 20, 12" square) Then cut the other three slots. Hopefully, they line up So, I had these done, needed to cut matching "pins" to fit into these.. I put away the sides, and the fence. Got out the edge guide the router came with. Set it to just short of the center of the dovetail bit. Brought that clamped up stack of shelves to the side of the bench, and moved the clamps a bit. One to clamp the stack TO the bench, bottom of the stack sits on the lower shelf of the bench. Ran the router along the outside edges of the stack...reset the guide to cut between two boards and made two more cuts...even though the router kept trying to snag it's own cord...three pins got done.. Turn this thing over, and repeat. I left the guide alone for the first two passes, then reset back to do the outside passes.. Then came the "FUN" of banging these into place in the sides....Big hammer & Block of Maple trick. Did not add any glue. I figure the plywood back and the face frame should hold the shelves in place. I checked the last 1 x 10 I have ....LARGE knot in the center of the 6' long plank has caused a problem.. Not a biggie, looks like face frame parts, to me..will cut the knot causing this split out. The part that isn't split further down will get trimmed for the top of the case. May add a strip to the back edge to get the 5/8" overhang I want....that is..5/8" over hang with the 3/4" thick face frame added....Maybe a 2" wide piece...hmmmmm. Need to figure out the blank for the raised panel in the door, again...depends on the width of the face frame, plus the width of the frame for the door. Have two of those "freckled" boards left, will add some plain trim to accent the fancy stuff... Stay tuned
  8. 5 points
    Ron Dudelston

    A First Today - Coffeebean

    When you get to be my age, there's not too much new under the sun. Today however, I have a new experience. Last week, Picked up a couple hundred board feet of cherry and maple from my wife's uncle and he tree an extra board into the mix. Around here we call it coffeebean but the official name of the tree is Kentucky coffeetree. It is a species of poplar and very fragrant. I ran the board through he planer and pretty soon the shop smelled like a spice drawer. I always thought cherry had a powerful fragrance but this stuff is over the top. I'm making a couple of jewelry boxes for summer shows and I thought I'd use coffeebean with a horizontal center strip of walnut. The wood is pretty open grained so we'll have to see how it all pans out.
  9. 5 points
    A SIGN IN A SHOE REPAIR STORE IN VANCOUVER : We will heel you We will save your sole We will even dye for you. A SIGN ON A BLINDS AND CURTAIN TRUCK: “Blind man driving.” Sign over a Gynecologist's Office: "Dr. Jones, at your cervix.” In a Podiatrist's office: "Time wounds all heels.” On a Septic Tank Truck: Yesterday's Meals on Wheels At an Optometrist's Office: "If you don't see what you're looking for, You've come to the right place.” On a Plumber's truck: "We repair what your husband fixed.” On another Plumber's truck: "Don't sleep with a drip. Call your plumber.” At a Tire Shop in Milwaukee: "Invite us to your next blowout.” On an Electrician's truck: "Let us remove your shorts.” In a Non-smoking Area: "If we see smoke, we will assu me you are on fire andwill take appropriate action.” On a Maternity Room door: "Push. Push. Push.” At a Car Dealership: "The best way to get back on your feet - miss a car payment.” Outside a Muffler Shop: "No appointment necessary. We hear you coming.” In a Veterinarian's waiting room: "Be back in 5 minutes. Sit! Stay!” At the Electric Company: "We would be delighted if you send in your payment on time. However, if you don't, YOU will be de-lighted.” In a Restaurant window: "Don't stand there and be hungry; come on in and get fed up.” In the front yard of a Funeral Home: "Drive carefully. We'll wait.” At a Propane Filling Station: "Thank Heaven for little grills.” In a Chicago Radiator Shop: "Best place in town to take a leak.” And the best one for last…; Sign on the back of another Septic Tank Truck: “Caution - This Truck is full of Political Promises”
  10. 4 points
    Grandpadave52

    Drilling it Down Part Deux

    Ooops, make that #27...somehow I forgot the most recent acquisition I described in the premier edition of Drill-it-Down...yep I definitely have a problem, with no cure in sight. Anyways, the newest member (to date) of the stable is a 7110, 3/8", single speed in the original 7116 Drill kit case. The only accessory is the key chuck. The drill shows limited use; the grease has melted over time into the case, so it needs disassembled, cleaned, new gear grease, armature commutator trued and cleaned. One of these days I'll stumble across some round-tuits. Thanks for indulging me yet again. Still owe you the vintage 5/8" M-W D-handle and the embarrassing tale of ~$200 woe going back 50 years.
  11. 4 points
    Dadio

    Walnut veneer Scrap Books

    A guy I didn't even know called me and said he was cleaning out a widows garage and had all this veneer that was stored in the attic her husband left behind. He didn't want to burn it so asked If I wanted it. When he showed upwith a small PU loaded with it. Some was trash but a lot was good but short lengths. I sorted it out and offered it to the WW club members ,had a few takers ,but had a lot left over. So I laid up several panels on birch plywood for my own use and still had a bunch left, so was looking for ways to use it and came up with this idea. I had my sisters name written hers, came out nice. It worked out good , everyone was happy with their little scrap book. Also made some veneer gift tags out of the scraps. Herb @Gerald I had the punch and binders .
  12. 4 points
    Grandpadave52

    A First Today - Coffeebean

    I'll take you up on the offer Ron...no hurry though. It will be a while before much gets done in my neck of the woods. Hopefully I could find something useful to make from a piece besides sawdust, shavings and chips.
  13. 4 points
    p_toad

    Drilling it Down

    I love this. Reminds me of my old, original B&D 1/4" drill that i used to drill some holes in pieces of hard rock maple from an old bowling alley. That drill got too hot to hold and the grease all ran out. After it cooled off, i refilled it with some axle grease (all i had back then) and kept on going. It didn't burn up and works to this day.
  14. 4 points
    Grandpadave52

    Drilling it Down Part Deux

    Not positive Dan, but likely early to mid 70's especially since it's in a blo-mold case. Late 60's to very early 70's typically were still in the metal case. This one is earlier than late 70's because the aluminum is polished. Later versions used a silver-gray paint over the metal versus polished. I do know my 1/2" 7210 was from either late 1968 or very early 1969; pretty sure it came in a metal case. I haven't found a good reference site. Some of mine are Type 1's, some are Type 2's. Most often if the tag giving the Model/Type/Spec #'s is still on the tool the ink has disappeared. The tags were only glued on and any oil/grease/water residue softened the glue allowing the tag to move or fall off. Very good tools but poor ID integrity.
  15. 4 points
    steven newman

    Next Project?

    Last readings I had were at 110. 29 MAR I'm going over to Columbus , OH to see a brain doctor....will see what he says, then.. Doing supper right now...running the router around now, doing sliding dovetail joints to connect the sides to the shelves....film later tonight, in case anyone wants... Picked up the LAST little can of minwax Golden Oak stain, today....will see how it turns out....
  16. 3 points
    Grandpadave52

    Drilling it Down

    A few weeks back, I posted a thread about a pick that included a Black & Decker corded drill kit. I also have alluded to the fact I may have a problem when it comes to the number of corded drills in my possession. Since the temperature is dropping and we alternate between white-out snow then momentary sunshine and now darkness, I thought I would present this thread for your entertainment, amusement, amazement and harassment. Enjoy the show. WARNING: Proceeding beyond this point is at your own risk. The content of this thread is not advised for those with rational thought processes or hoarding phobias. Some restrictions apply. Void where prohibited. Must be 18 to enter. So it began one December 7th many years ago for my 17th (maybe 18th??) birthday I think. I received my first power-tool. A Skil, 3/8" VS Model 569 drill. Who knew this would eventually lead to an addiction. I did replace the swithc once several years ago. Shortly there-after, my dad also gave me a 1/4" Mall Model 143 drill that had belonged to my grand-father. It has to be from the late 1940's to early 1950's. The original cord finally disintegrated. I replaced it 35+ years ago with the current cord which now needs replaced. I need to search out cord strain reliefs although the spark plug boots i used to use worked pretty well. These were my primary drills for years both at home and occasionally in my work life. The Mall has a piece missing in the replaceable handle portion which is the way I inherited it. That nugget of information is relevant later on in this drill dynasty. Next up is my Black & Decker 1/2" VS, Model 7210. It's story begins in the first JD Dealership I worked. That was in 1973. The drill was already in service and likely had been purchased in the late 1960's from Grainger's. The dealer eventually closed so we parted ways for a year or so. A new dealer reopened the dealership and I was recruited as the Service Manager Low and behold the drill and I was reunited as most of the tooling from the old dealership had been purchased. Some time later, one of the "rookie" mechanics pushed this drill beyond its limits. The armature windings separated from the commutator bar. A replacement was needed immediately and as luck had it, the Mac Tool Rep had just began carrying a new line called Makita. We purchased a 1/2", VSR double insulated drill upon his recommendation. We sent the B&D in for repair evaluation estimate. The cost to replace the armature, brushes and refurb the drill came back more than the new Makita so this drill got tossed back in the cabinet. Several years later during a clean-up session the drill was set out to be trashed. I asked if I could have it and was granted the request. It laid in a box at home for a number of years. I finally made a trip to the old B&D Service Center in Indy, bought an armature, couple set of brushes for around $35 at the time. Finally had to replace the cord a few years back. While doing some remodeling work at my daughters, either my ex SIL or oldest grandson apparently dropped the drill on the "nib" on the upper back handle breaking it in the mounting screw/rear bearing housing. Calling B&D/DeWalt Service Centers all over the country yielded no parts available. I eventually was able to locate a "parts donor" drill but not before lots of searching which leads to a long tale yet to come. I have the original manual and dead-man handle for the drill also. It was and still is a great drill...low RPM and lots of torque. In the midst of the above I acquired this old Sioux, 1/4" in-line drill. It was given to me by a former mechanic. Probably from the 50's. The switch was bad as was the original cord (dry rot). It is the same frame and motor unit as the old Sioux hard-seat grinder. Instead of the angle seat driver head, Sioux offered an alternative drive head. I came upon a used hard seat grinder the Mac Tool Rep had traded for. The gears were bad, but the was switch good...gave a couple bucks for it. Replaced the switch. This drill still gets a lot of use running a carbon cleaning brush and other wire wheel attachments. Probably will need a new cord in the not to distant future. Somewhere in the 90's, I had a need for a D-handle 1/2" drill; something that would do heavier duty work than the 1/2" B&D. My wife bought me this Craftsman for Christmas one year. VSR model. Actually my first reversible corded drill. I primarily have used it to run a paddle to mix drywall compound and thin set mortar. Maybe have drilled a couple dozen 5/8" dia. holes in steel with a twist bit. The (3) on the right followed. The left one is a 1/4" Dunlap made for Sears; circa late 40's early 50's; bought at a flea market for a couple of bucks; it works fine, just needs disassembled, cleaned, new gear grease and the aluminum body polished; The middle is another Mall 143; another flea market find for $3; I originally bought it to use for parts my old 143 however it works great, so again just disassemble, clean, re-lube and polish. The one on the right is an old Montgomery Ward given to me by my late FIL. He got it in a box of crap treasures at an auction. Obviously needs a cord and the normal clean & re-lube. I've had it for years; just need to find round-to-its for all three. Close up view of the Dunlap tag. Also a Did just a little preliminary buffing to see how it would polish up. The Mall 143 tag. The "three amigos", oppoosite side on the far right. You can see they remain in their natural wild state...now where are those round-tu-its? Now back to the quest finding a replacement handle section for the B&D 1/2" VS. So I watched flea markets, yards sales, and even a few auctions to no avail finding a parts donor to repair this drill. Even eBay was coming up empty. Finally a hit on eBay...I won an auction for a 1/2" (one owner). If I recall about $14 with the shipping. However, when I got the drill, it was so pristine, I couldn't bring myself to cannibalize it. It had the dead-man handle but the cord had been replaced. It's the one on the left; I'm pretty sure it's a U-126 like the one on the right. Only single speed, but a very nice drill. The one on the right came later in the parts quest. Found it at a flea market for $8 with some weird coupling attachment in place of the chuck, but pristine other-wise. I bought a Jacobs chuck from H-F. $10 less 20% coupon so $8 for a new chuck bringing the total to $16. The parts quest continued...the one on the far right I believe to be a model 7120 although might be an 1161; both are 3/8" VS models. Anyways won that bid on eBay as a parts only drill...if I recall, it was ~$9 with shipping; might have been less...when I received it, as stated it did not work. Began disassembling to swap the handles and noticed a loose wire in the switch and wires not in the right locations; straighten all that out, and it works fine...so the quest rolls on. The one on the left is a Model U-100, 1/4", single speed; a little different rear handle design without the nub, but interchangeable. Picked that one up for a couple bucks...did the normal disassembly/clean-up; works great...the quest continues... While I continued to watch eBay, after two purchases all of a sudden these style drills began popping up like mushrooms. Seems every flea market I had tried before now were crawling with them... These 2 were next; a 7110 I think, 3/8" single speed in the original metal B&D box for $5. Another U-100 for $3 but needed a cord. H-F has 10' neon orange and sometimes green extension cords on sale for ~$4 from time-to-time. I keep a supply of them as replacement cords; far cheaper than actual replacement cords. Both of these work great and needed minimal clean-up. Next in the quest to find a handle were the two on the right. Finally, success. I gave $3 for the pair. Robbed the handle off the top one. The bottom one while it will run, the front bearing is shot. However I could take these two and make one good usable drill should I need an extra. Unfortunately, by this time the disease had over taken me so.................................... At one of my favorite flea infestations, I stumbled on this Skil 599. Now knowing how hard finding replacement parts for the B&D had been, I justified this purchase figuring the cord and switch would interchange with my first drill if needed. Since it was only $5. As dumb luck would have it, this is a hammer, scraper, drill VSR, 3/8". It all works so.... The drill on the right beckoned me and since I didn't own a plain ole, 3/8" VSR and it was only $5, I succumbed. Knowing how hard parts might be to get for it, the left one appeared at a yard sale. It was in a bucket, chuck down with about an 2" of water...well the cord & switch is probably good and for $2...dang the luck, it cleaned up pretty nice except for a little erosion on the nose housing, works like a champ so... This one in the original case although missing some of the accessories..still needs refurbed when I find some of those round tuits so... This orphan needed a good home and for $8 in the original case with accessories and then.... This trio actually preceded the two sets above. The one on the far right is a U-203; kinda' rare; 1/4" 2 speed. I use it a lot with various brushes to do cleaning and polishing. A slightly different version of the U-100 in the middle, then I'm not sure of the model on the left, but a 3/8" VS. Of course when the first B&D 1/2" went down, I needed an immediate, budget friendly replacement so H-F to the rescue with this 1/2" VSR model....with a coupon it was $24 and some change with tax. It works great and have used it to mix thin set and drywall compound also. So.... It all started when this drill handle failed....so....... There is one more to this stable but current weather conditions prevent me from moving stuff out to get to the cabinet. It's an old Montgomery Ward (I think), D handle with a 1/2" pipe dead man, 5/8" chuck that belonged to my grand-dad I inherited when my dad passed. That drill cost me $200 about 50 years ago. I'll update this saga with it's unique story in the future. These of course are just my corded drills and does not include any of the cordless, screw-guns or drill presses. Once I get over my shame for this post and ya'll recover from the shock and trauma of reading this post, maybe I'll entertain you in another show. Just so you know, I have put back many other drills to allow others around the world to the joy of owning a corded drill if only for a moment. Assuming you remained conscious to this point, thanks for following along. BTW, if you were counting you should have come up with 26 drills total. I may have a problem???
  17. 3 points
    John Morris

    This Just Pmo...

    8 years my friend, 8 more years, retirement and a move.
  18. 3 points
    Well thank you for your feedback Gene, as a matter of fact I have put in 100's of hours becoming familiar with the software that we are using for our "Main" and "Wiki" websites. We are using an Open Source software called TikiWiki, I am a contributor as well at the TikiWiki website. Since the software is completely free to use, it has it's many challenges, and I have had to develop a scale of patience that rivals Mother Theresa to get this software to do what I need it to do. It's still not there, but very close. The software is open development, so any bugs and improvements are fixed or implemented by an open source community who volunteers their own time to fix and advance the TikiWiki software. I wanted free, as free is great for my pocket book, but being free, comes with an expense of time to understand it and work around the shortcomings of the software. But ya, we are getting there, it's been a long road behind the scenes, I have been working on our "Wiki" for three years in my spare time, this new "Main" site I have been working on for the last 6 months.
  19. 3 points
    Dadio

    Drilling it Down Part Deux

    I think they called that plastic, Bakelite. We didn't get a TV til around 1955, My mother told my Dad he couldn't get one til he put a crapper in the house. Herb
  20. 3 points
  21. 3 points
  22. 3 points
    It Was Al B

    Next Project?

    Steve, I don't know how you do it. You manage to spend more time in the shop when you're not feeling well than I could while feeling great. Hope your MRI results show your issues can be taken care of without surgery. I've been treated by an Endochronologist for the past 4 years with pills for a 13mm (approx 7/8" diameter) sized growth on the pituitary gland. Pills were supposed to shrink the growth. That didn't happen, but they did stabilize it so that the growth hasn't further enlarged.Your woodworking is obviously your motivation, but do get the rest you need. We want you around here for a long time to come, but more than that your family wants you with them.
  23. 3 points
    It Was Al B

    Stephen Hawkings....

    Maybe so Ron. I thought that he believed the universe itself was god, though he never said it in so many words. Through all his hardships he always maintained his sense of humor.
  24. 3 points
    It Was Al B

    Drilling it Down Part Deux

    Enter the era of plastic tools and plastic cars.
  25. 3 points
    p_toad

    A Big Happy Birthday Too

    Many happy returns (and hopefully you get some of the cake next time).
  26. 3 points
    Stick486

    A Big Happy Birthday Too

    can't be... still some left..
  27. 3 points
    Chips N Dust

    Tabs on the Weather...

    John, this is a warning - you are getting political. LOL
  28. 3 points
    Larry Schweitzer

    Next Project?

    One of the first signs of diabetes is having to pee really often. Trust me you don't want to become diabetic! Been there, am that. Family history of it? Over weight? You can check your blood glucose with a cheap meter from Wal-Mart, $15, Test strips $9 for 50. If it has been more than 4 hours since you ate your reading should be in the range of 70 to 120 "normal." If you check an hour after you ate it shouldn't be over 185. I've got half dozen meters mostly Wal-Mart a couple of expensive ones from big name drug companies that give very similar readings to the cheap Wal-Mart ones. Take care of that body, they don't sell replacements.
  29. 3 points
    John Moody

    A Big Happy Birthday Too

    Thanks all for the birthday wishes. I’ve had a great day. Worked at the range, shot guns, did a little wood working and now I’m in the recliner.
  30. 2 points
    Introduction We have a wonderful, fully functional woodworking community and forum in The Patriot Woodworker. This page, this website, the whole experience is based on a single forum software package, a very sophisticated software package, but it does have it's limitations. For those who may be familiar with website development and the software that is used, may understand that forum software can be limited in its use. For that reason I have developed a website that will be our "Main" page for our community. This "Main" page will not change the way you view our community here, in this forum. As a matter of fact, the link that you have been using to access this community will not change. What I am doing is simply creating a standalone website that is the face of our Patriot Woodworker's. And we will have a menu option in your navigation tools above, called simply "Main". When the tab is live, all you'll do is click on the "Main" navigation tab and you'll be taken to the face of our community. At the new website, there is a tab in the navigation you'll click on to get back here. Easy peasy. Screenshot of our community navigation now, click on "Main" to be taken to our new website. Once you are at the new "Main" website, click on the "Forums" drop down to navigate back to your forums. Why? Well, because as you can see, we have a ton of information to put out, and our main forum page is getting crowded and long. There are departments here that I am surprised to hear when a long time user of our community exclaims, "Hey, look what I found, I had no idea this was here? Is this new?", well no it's not new, it's been there for years, but it was buried under the many tabs of our forum community. So our new "face of our community" website will be able to showcase those areas that are buried deep in our forum community. When we create notices and news letters that promote our community, and as we share our community on our social media outlets, for the most part this new "Main" website will be where we direct viewers too. Again, they will see who we are and what we do, immediately. When? For now we'll open the "Main" site (under development so be patient) so you can poke around and see where we are heading with this. We'll keep it open for a couple days for your review and feedback and then we'll close it down for further development. It should be ready very soon for it's grand opening, but we just wanted to get some feedback, positive or negative from you, our most valued users. Click on the graphic to access the "Main" website. Once you are at the new "Main" site, you may also find your way to our "Wiki" that we have been working on for a very extended period of time. If you do find your way there, feel free to click through the pages, and just have fun. It too will be open relatively soon. Content The content of our "Main" site will be an introduction of who we are and what we do as a woodworking community. You'll see the home page immediately communicates the feel of our community and why we exist. Go ahead and click around, read the articles, meanwhile keeping in mind we are not done, some articles may appear incomplete, and probably they are. The new "Main" website will also be where I focus my own efforts within the blogsphere, I will create blogs related to our events and projects, and I will also feature some of my own woodworking projects I am working on at the new "Main" website. In closing Once our "Main" website goes live, it will be closed for editing by our general membership, and open only at this time to our admins. It's not meant as a collaborative project, but only as the face of us, for new guests and browsers to be introduced to.
  31. 2 points
    Steve Krumanaker

    The second cryptex

    This is the second cryptex I've finished. I re wrote the border file and I like this look much better. This one is a five ring code as I'm going to use it for the demo at our next meeting of the NorthEast Indiana Turners and Chiselers(NEITC). Anyone care to guess what is the code?? The first one actually works smoother, I didn't dry fit the rings before gluing it up and I should have. Oh well, someone said in another thread, it's how we grow. Steve
  32. 2 points
    Cal

    A big ol' Happy Birthday today to...

    @HARO50 Happy Birthday buddy! Hope it is a great one John!!!
  33. 2 points
    Stick486

    This Just Pmo...

    John, your state has... ...... ummmmmm .... WHAT THE.... ......... what a mess.... time for you to save your soul and get out...
  34. 2 points
    Smallpatch

    Drilling it Down Part Deux

    When we moved to California in 1941 our shack in Texas didn't have anything. No electricity, running water or a sewer and the first little three room house in California had all three.. My mother thought she had died and gone to heaven. We had just gotten settled out there and the war started. Black curtains and air raid sirens going off often for we were 18 miles from the ocean and close to Lockeed and a few other plants and dad got a job welding ships together for they turned him down for the army.. Our school was a collection place for scrap metal so no sports for all the flat ground was piled with car bodies and metal...Don't you know how many old cars would be running around if there had been no war...and not long after the war started, rubber tubes were replaced with synthetic rubber and that was bad for the kids who had sling shots...and the day the war ended the chevy house had a set of gas pumps and the price of gas was 20 cents a gallon and the first guy that morning came up on a motor cycle and said fill er up...and did not need a ration stamp, just the money..Only one gas station in Yorba Linda in 1945.
  35. 2 points
    Gene Howe

    Walnut veneer Scrap Books

    Once more, that's one really neat idea, Herb. And, so are those tags.
  36. 2 points
    Gene Howe

    This Just Pmo...

    That's way beyond comprehension. I would consider their justification remarks some of the most racist verbiage I've seen in print in quite some time. Shameful.
  37. 2 points
    p_toad

    This Just Pmo...

    So, does that mean they're gonna call ghostbusters and not 911 next time they need help?
  38. 2 points
  39. 2 points
  40. 2 points
  41. 2 points
    Stick486

    Walnut veneer Scrap Books

    SWEET!!!
  42. 2 points
    Thanks Lew. Nice post again this week. I have never had mush lick with burrs on a scraper. They didn't seem to last long. Those new Easy Wood Tools are so sharp they make the best finish scrapers I have ever used. I made snowmen as ornaments one year. Those you showed are quite attractive. I really like the ball caps.
  43. 2 points
    John Morris

    Tabs on the Weather...

    Thanks for the polite heads up and warning Chips, I knew we picked the right guy in you for this forum.
  44. 2 points
    Ron Dudelston

    Stephen Hawkings....

    Admired his will but didn't care for the guy. He thought he was God.
  45. 2 points
    LarryS

    A Big Happy Birthday Too

    Happy Birthday John!!! I see that I'm late for the cake again.
  46. 2 points
    John Morris

    Tabs on the Weather...

    I think global warming is only happening in Southern CA. And all the scientists who advocate that position, live here.
  47. 2 points
    Cliff

    vacuum sysstem in up and running

    well looky a bowl gosh darn the blasted thing works. Ya know multiply those 15 pounds per sq inch really add up to substantial force~!!! I played with pulling that sucker off all through the pressure range and it was unmovable without destroying the bowl way down to a lousy five inches of mercury. I think I'll like this gizmo AND THERE's a VIDEO but when up load them they only show as a link. bowl on vac chuck-01.mp4
  48. 2 points
    HARO50

    A Big Happy Birthday Too

    All the best on your big day, John. Sorry, I couldn't use the carpenter one....... it kinda got Shnewjed. John FWIW, did you know you shared a birthday with another great mind? Albert Einstein! He was born a few years earlier, though....... 1879. Oh yes, and you JUST missed sharing the day with the greatest mind of our time. ME!
  49. 2 points
  50. 2 points
    schnewj

    Drilling it Down

    Great job, Gramps! I still have some of those old 3/8 Craftsman drills. I keep a 90° chuck on one, for those awkward angles and tight spaces. The cordless drills are my go-to for most tasks, but when you need run time and torque you just can't beat the corded drills. Some great classics there...just stay out of the water with those metal case ones.
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